diploma di pianoforte

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by difficultname, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. difficultname New Member

    italian
    Si tratta di un cv.
    Volevo sapere se per i diplomi in uno strumento musicale la terminologia è la stessa che per gli altri diplomi.
    Posso tradurre
    To receive a diploma in piano from the academy of music in Milan?
    Opp to earn a piano diploma from the academy of music "giuseppe verdi" in Milan?

    Ps. ora i diplomi di strumento in italia sono stati equiparati a lauree di primo livello, cambia qualcosa?

    Attendo i vostri suggerimenti.
    Grazie!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2008
  2. Rosa7

    Rosa7 Senior Member

    Australia
    English (Australia)
    Suonerebbe bene "Received a Diploma in Piano from the 'Giuseppe Verdi' Music Academy in Milan".

    Secondo me, se hai studiato per tre anni presso un'università, potresti scrivere che hai ricevuto un "Bachelor of Music (Piano)".

    Fra noi in Australia, un diploma di musica si può ottenere senza studiare all'università (si deve soltanto fare un esame) oppure con uno o due anni di studio. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2008
  3. difficultname New Member

    italian
    Grazie mille rosa7!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2008
  4. Salegrosso Senior Member

    Napoli (Italy)
    Verona (Italy)
    Hi Difficultname, welcome to the forum!

    I would definitely write Conservatorio, which is its exact name, and, possibly, I would add in parenthesis something like "Italian State Music Academy".

    Have a look on this thread, especially the post no.7, where the question was very similar.
    In my CV in the end I had chosen:

    Diploma di pianoforte, conferred in February 2003 at the Conservatorio ''F.E. Dall'Abaco'' of Verona.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  5. Rosa7

    Rosa7 Senior Member

    Australia
    English (Australia)
    I think you could write "Conservatorium of Music" without explanation (Melbourne Uni's music faculty is a 'Conservatorium', widely known as "The Con".)

    Salegrosso, the point made in that thread about musicians being able to read Italian is a very valid one - your version sounds fine.

    A google search shows me that in the US (and Beijing) they seem to call it a "Conservatory of Music". I like the Latin version better. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  6. Salegrosso Senior Member

    Napoli (Italy)
    Verona (Italy)
    Here I found this nice website of the 'European Association of Conservatoires' (AEC),
    which is, they say, "a European cultural and educational network with more than 248 member institutions for professional music training in 55 countries".

    These 55 countries include in fact USA and China (Rosa you're right! :) ), and also Australia (where appear 'Sidney Conservatorium' and 'Queensland Conservatorium', with the Latin version you mentioned above for "Melbourne's Con"), as well as all European countries.​

    Personally, I prefer to not translate the original name of any cultural institution.
    For example, writing in Italian, I would say
    ... ha seguito un corso di laurea in Architettura presso l'UCL - University College London della durata di ... and I wouldn't translate its name into Italian ("Collegio Universitario di Londra"? It doesn't sound very well).
    Analogously, writing in English, I wouldn't translate the Italian name of Italian institution such as Universita', Conservatorio, Scuola, and so on.
    Rather, when I want to be sure that every reader can easily understand what I write, I would add a translation or short description in parenthesis. But probably, as Rosa said, this is not needed for 'conservatorio'.​
    Anyway, this is a matter of personal taste.

    Difficultname, you can check that on the website of the Royal Academy of Music of London the word 'Diploma' appears.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  7. Rosa7

    Rosa7 Senior Member

    Australia
    English (Australia)
    I agree with Salegrosso that it is a stylistic choice whether you translate names of institutions.

    Now that I think about it, on my English CV, I put down that I had studied at the "Università per Stranieri di Siena". But I would not think it sounded wrong if someone else wrote down the "University for Foreigners of Siena" (which in any case is how I would refer to it when speaking).

    Maybe it sounds worse translating English names into Italian, than it does the other way around? 'Collegio Universitario di Londra' does sound a bit strange.
     
  8. Salegrosso Senior Member

    Napoli (Italy)
    Verona (Italy)
    Rosa, I do exactly as you do: when speaking, in Italian I say "lavoro al dipartimento di Matematica dell'universita' di Bath", whereas in my Italian CV I write "... presso il Department of Mathematical Sciences della University of Bath", using the original names.

    I think it may sound strange in both directions. UCL is an extreme example, but also translating into English "Superior Normal School of Pisa" sounds worst than the original name.
    However, it's true that in Italian we translate English names into Italian less often than you translate Italian/foreigner names into English, whence this feeling you wrote, I guess.
     

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