Discussion: [general] Comptines / Nursery rhymes

Discussion in 'Themed Lists' started by KittyCatty, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. KittyCatty

    KittyCatty Senior Member

    Cambridge
    English UK
    Following the popular and enjoyable fairy-tales thread, I will start everyone off on French and English nursery rhymes! :)

    (A personal favourite)

    Oh! The Grand old Duke of York
    He had ten thousand men
    He marched them up to the top of the hill and he marched them down again.
    And when they were up, they were up
    And when they were down, they were down
    And when they were only half way up, they were neither up nor down.
     
  2. Lezert

    Lezert Senior Member

    Midi-Pyrénées
    french, France
    The two ones i immediately remember:

    Dodo, l'enfant do,
    L'enfant dormira bien vite
    Dodo, l'enfant do,
    L'enfant dormira bientôt

    or this one:

    Meunier tu dors
    Ton moulin ton moulin va trop vite
    Meunier tu dors
    Ton moulin ton moulin va trop fort

    there is other ones here:
    http://www.momes.net/comptines/content.html
     
  3. sioban

    sioban Senior Member

    Orléans
    french - France
    I remember this one:

    Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère
    Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo
    Maman est en haut, qui fait un gâteau
    Papa est en bas, qui fait du chocolat
     
  4. Lezert

    Lezert Senior Member

    Midi-Pyrénées
    french, France
    Peut-être un peu "hors champs", mais elle est tellement belle cette chanson d'Henri Salvador:

    Une chanson douce
    Que me chantait ma maman
    En suçant mon pouce
    Tous les soirs en m'endormant
     
  5. KittyCatty

    KittyCatty Senior Member

    Cambridge
    English UK
    Wow that's great, there are loads on that link!
    I will add some more

    1. Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are. [sometimes it's where you are]
    Up above the world so high
    Like a diamond in the sky
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star
    How I wonder what you are.

    2. Row, row, row your boat, gently down the stream
    Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, Life is but a dream.

    3. I went to the animal fair
    The birds and the beasts were there
    The big baboon by the light of the moon
    was combing his auburn hair
    The monkey fell out of his bunk
    And slid down the elephant's trunk (wheeeee!)
    The elephant sneezed and fell on his knees
    But what became of the monkey, monkey, monkey, monkey, monkey, monkey monk?
     
  6. zaby

    zaby Senior Member

    Une souris verte
    qui courait dans l'herbe
    Je l'attrape par la queue,
    je la montre à ces messieurs
    Ces messieurs me disent :
    "trempez-la dans l'huile,
    trempez-la dans l'eau,
    ça fera un escargot tout chaud"
     
  7. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    C'est un lapin africain,
    Il a les oreilles vertes !
    Il m'a dit peins-moi,
    Peins-moi ma p'tite oreille,
    Mais moi je ne veux pas,
    Et ne la peins pas !
     
  8. Lezert

    Lezert Senior Member

    Midi-Pyrénées
    french, France
    Cadet Rousselle a trois maisons
    Qui n'ont ni poutres, ni chevrons
    Cadet Rousselle a trois maisons
    Qui n'ont ni poutres, ni chevrons
    C'est pour loger les hirondelles,
    Que direz-vous d'Cadet Rousselle ?
    Ah ! Ah ! Ah ! oui vraiment,
    Cadet Rousselle est bon enfant.

    il y en a d'autres ici:
    http://www.paroles.net/artis/1008
     
  9. Lezert

    Lezert Senior Member

    Midi-Pyrénées
    french, France
    de ma maman qui n'a commencé à parler le français qu'à l'école ...
    (langue d'oc)


    cinc sòus costèron
    cinc sòus costèron
    cinc sòus costèron meis esclòps
    Quant èran
    Quant èran
    Quant èran nòus
    costèron
    costèron
    costèron cinc sòus

    (cinq sous coutèrent ...mes sabots...quand ils étaient neufs)
     
  10. Clayjar

    Clayjar Senior Member

    Canada
    English, Canada
    Un autre de l'anglias:

    On doit comprendre que "Humpty Dumpty" est un oeuf.

    Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.
    Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
    All the King's horses and all the King's men
    Couldn't put Humpty together again!
     
  11. unefemme1 Senior Member

    English, New Zealand
    Here are two English ones:

    Hickory, dickory dock,
    The mouse ran up the clock.
    The clock struck one, the mouse ran down.
    Hickory dickory dock.

    Goosy goosy Gander
    Where shall I wander?
    Upstairs and downstairs, and in my lady's chamber
    And there I met an old man
    Who wouldn't say his prayers
    So i bit him by the left leg
    And threw him down the stairs.
     
  12. Lavinia.dNP

    Lavinia.dNP Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Sicilian with Italian-French mothertongue
    I have the french equivalent for this english nursery song:

    Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are. [sometimes it's where you are]
    Up above the world so high
    Like a diamond in the sky
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star
    How I wonder what you are.

    Here it is :

    Quand trois poules vont aux champs
    La première va devant
    La seconde suit la première
    La troisième est la dernière
    Quand trois poules vont aux champs
    La première va devant.

    It's completely different, and much less poetic, but here in France that's how they sing it with the same melody as "twinkle, twinkle little star"
     
  13. curly

    curly Senior Member

    English - Ireland
    My favourite is

    Ring around the rosie,
    A pocket full of posies,
    a-tishoo! a-tishoo!
    well all fall down
     
  14. Clayjar

    Clayjar Senior Member

    Canada
    English, Canada
    In Canada, this poem is slightly different.

    Ring around the rosey,
    A pocket full of posies
    Husha, Husha
    We all fall down!

    This is actually a reference to the Black Plague. :( More info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_Around_the_Rosie
     
  15. RuK Senior Member

    Outside Paris
    English/lives France
    On the same music to 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star', I have a book of sheet-music for French nursery songs, which has

    Ah vous dirai-je maman
    Ce qui cause mon torment:
    Papa veut que je raisonne
    Comme une grande personne.
    Moi je dis que les bonbons
    Valent mieux que la raison.
     
  16. curly

    curly Senior Member

    English - Ireland
    The music is the same as that of barney's "i love you, you love me" song.

    This old man, he play one,
    he played knick knack on my drum,
    with a knick knack paddy whack,
    give a dog a bone,
     
  17. jemappellekelly Senior Member

    Canada
    English & Français
    I don't think we can generalize to all of Canada.

    I know the song as:

    Ring around the rosey,
    A pocket full of posies
    Ashes, ashes
    We all fall down!
     
  18. Panpan

    Panpan Senior Member

    Sawbridgeworth, UK
    England, English
    Half a pound of tuppeney rice
    Half a pound of treacle
    That's the way the money goes
    Pop goes the weasel

    Up and down the City Road
    In and out the Eagle
    That's the way the money goes
    Pop goes the weasel

    Now sung as a nursery rhyme, but it started out as a drinking song. Rice and treacle was the original 'home brew' kit, and 'the Eagle' was (still is) a pub in City Road, Islington, London. This is the area where tailors used to work. A weasel is a piece of equipment used by tailors. To 'pop' used to mean to pawn an article for security to a money lender.

    Regards

    Panpan
     
  19. 8jatpc Junior Member

    Pyrénées Atlantiques
    French, France
    Quand la nuit se pose,
    Se pose,
    Se pose,
    Que toutes les choses
    Reposent
    Sans bruit
    Quand les paupières se closent,
    Se closent,
    Se closent,
    Comme une rose
    Qui se replie
    J'aime ce moment,
    J'aime ce moment
    Où l'on dit doucement:
    Bonne nuit
    Bonne nuit
    Bonne nuit
    Boonne nuiit
     
  20. alisonp Senior Member

    London
    English - UK
  21. GEmatt

    GEmatt Senior Member

    La Côte, Switzerland
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Three blind mice, three blind mice.
    See how they run, see how they run!
    They all ran after the farmer's wife,
    Who cut off their tails with a carving knife!
    .....

    GEmatt
     
  22. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    I also knew this French version but not Lavinia.dNP's version.

    A link to English site with music for some songs.
     
  23. Panpan

    Panpan Senior Member

    Sawbridgeworth, UK
    England, English
    Anyone know this one?; my grandmother used to sing it to me (I had a sweet tooth).

    Je suis un petit garcon
    De bon figure (She pronounced 'bon' with two syllables 'bon - eux')
    Je suis aime bien les bon-bons
    Et la confiture
    Si vous voulez me donner
    Je serrais bein les manger
    Je suis un petit garcon
    De bon figure.

    Does 'Je suis aime bien' make sense? It dosn't seem to, although this is what I remember, but I was very little.
    Panpan
     
  24. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    I remember it too. Figure is feminine, so you should write "bonne figure".
    And it's "savoir bien (les manger)" not "être bien". ;)
    (I think the end is something along those lines: "La bonne aventure ô gué, la bonne aven-tu-u-re !")
     
  25. curly

    curly Senior Member

    English - Ireland
    Oh mammy i'm not happy!
    There's something in my nappy!
    It's big and brown!
    I can't sit down!
    If I do i'll squash it
    and then you'll have to wash it
    and that's no joke,
    the washing machine's broke!

    A personal thanks to my long suffering mother/slave
     
  26. ChiMike Senior Member

    Chicago USA
    USA, English
    Twinkle, Twinkle little bat
    How I wonder what you're at
    Up above the world you fly
    Like a tea-tray in the sky.

    The original is a poem by Jane Taylor, The Star (1806) and it has four more verses. The other is, of course, the Mad Hatter's, which he started to sing at "the great concert given by the Queen of Hearts" but she screamed he was "murdering the time" (killing it not being sufficient ;)) and she declared (as usual) "Off with his head."

    The usual tune is known in French as: "Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman?"
    Mozart wrote a quite delightful set of variations on it.
    Here is one set of words:

    Ah ! Vous dirai-je, Maman,
    Ce qui cause mon tourment ?
    Papa veut que je raisonne,
    Comme une grande personne ;
    Moi, je dis que les bonbons
    Valent mieux que la raison.

    But here is another (and probably earlier) set, just to show that Carroll did not get his ideas about "fair use" from thin air:

    Ah ! Vous dirai-je, Maman,
    Ce qui cause mon tourment ?
    Depuis que j'ai vu Silvandre,
    Me regarder d'un air tendre ;
    Mon cœur dit à chaque instant :
    « Peut-on vivre sans amant ? »

    L'autre jour, dans un bosquet,
    De fleurs il fit un bouquet ;
    Il en para ma houlette
    Me disant : « Belle brunette,
    Flore est moins belle que toi ;
    L'amour moins tendre que moi. »

    Je rougis et par malheur
    Un soupir trahit mon cœur.
    Le cruel avec adresse,
    Profita de ma faiblesse :
    Hélas, Maman ! Un faux pas
    Me fit tomber dans ses bras.

    Je n'avais pour tout soutien
    Que ma houlette et mon chien.
    L'amour, voulant ma défaite,
    Ecarta chien et houlette ;
    Ah ! Qu'on goûte de douceur,
    Quand l'amour prend soin d'un cœur!

    And the version of "The Animal Fair" I know has:
    The monkey! He got drunk
    (Alternative: The funniest was the monk, Who sat)
    And SAT on the Elephant's trunk.
    The Elephant sneezed etc.

    Which makes more sense, since the monkey was sitting, probably, on the end of his trunk and the sneeze blew him to Kingdom Come! The author of this one is unknown. It has a charming tune as well.

    And "Row, row, row" is a song meant to be sung as a round (a four part canon).

    Adding some others which also have tunes:

    1. Round and round the mulberry bush (the cobbler's bench)
    The monkey chased the weasel.
    The monkey thought 'twas all in fun.
    Pop! goes the weasel.

    A penny for a spool of thread,
    A penny for a needle,
    That's the way to money goes.
    Pop! goes the weasel.

    2. Jack and Jill went up the hill
    To fetch a pail of water.
    Jack fell down
    And broke his crown,
    And Jill came
    Tumbling after.

    3. Three blind mice!
    Three blind mice!
    See how they run!
    She how they run!
    They all ran up to the farmer's wife.
    She cut off their tails with a carving knife.
    Have you ever seen such a sight in your life,
    As three blind mice!

    (this one can also be sung as a round...)
     

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