Disponer de = have / to have (infinitive)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by ezpeto, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. ezpeto Junior Member

    Spanish
    Buenas tardes!!!

    Estoy traduciendo el plan de calidad de mi escuela al inglés, y me queda la duda de si al traducirlo debo usar el to o no en los infinitivos. Ejemplo

    Disponer de una herramienta informatizada de evaluación de la labor docente y del progreso del estudiante.

    Mi intento:

    Have a computerized tool to evaluate our educational work and our
    students´progress.

    Muchas gracias!!!!!
     
  2. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello. Personally, if this is part of a list and especially if it has bullet points (see example), I would include 'to.'

    Our goals are:

    - To have a computerized tool...


    Let's see what others say.
     
  3. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    I'm sure both are possible. Personally, I would use the 'bare infinitive' in a list:

    - Develop a computerised list...
    - Monitor student progress...
    - Record teacher progress in doing...
    - Measure whatever...
     
  4. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello Wandering JJ!

    So how does the intro to the list read? Does it include the 'to?'

    Ex. Our goals are to:

    Greetings from Chicago
     
  5. donbeto

    donbeto Senior Member

    Vancouver (Canada)
    Eng (Canada)
    Or maybe just Our goals:
     
  6. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Hi Kayokid!

    Apologies for missing this post earlier. Yes, 'Our aims/goals are to:...' or something like 'We plan to carry out the following:...' without using 'to' in every subsquent line.

    I'll be in your city next month!

    Greetings from snowy England.
     
  7. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello donbeto and Wandering JJ,

    My thought on the wording is that somewhere there should be the word 'to'... either in the title or after the bullet.

    I am not sure from what you wrote that you agree...
     
  8. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Personally I would not use 'to' but introduce the list with something like:

    Our plans include the following:
    We plan to carry out the following:
    The quality plan includes the following items:

    Strictly speaking you are correct in that a 'to' is required somewhere, but in practice, when I introduce a bullet point list in studies, I usually omit any 'to' and use the 'following/as follows' formula. I'm sure it's a question of style.
     

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