do someone proud?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by dathrilla, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. dathrilla Senior Member

    American English, New York
    Hi,

    I've heard "do someone proud" a lot...Is it grammatically correct? what's wrong with "make someone proud" ?
     
  2. GenJen54

    GenJen54 Senior Member

    Downright Pleasant, USA
    USA - English
    Nothing is wrong with "make someone proud."

    To do someone proud means the same thing, but is a more informal, colloquial expression. It is not gramatically correct.
     
  3. dathrilla Senior Member

    American English, New York
    Ok, thanks.
     
  4. mgarizona

    mgarizona Senior Member

    Phoenix, AZ
    US - American English
    Just speculating, but I think there's a slight difference between the two.

    If I say 'you make me proud' I'm saying 'I'm proud of you.'

    If I say 'you do me proud' I'm saying 'I take pride in your accomplisment.'

    'do me proud' takes a certain amount of claim for the success.

    Consider this: You can say "He did himself proud today" to mean 'he had every right to be proud of what he accomplished today.' You can't say "He made himself proud today." That doesn't make any sense.
     
  5. A90Six Senior Member

    London
    England - English.
    To do someone proud is an informal idiom meaning, to give or show (someone) good hospitality, treatment or ententertainment. "We always do them proud when they visit us."
    It can also be taken to mean, to make someone proud. It is often used as encouragement from a family member, friend, mentor, etc., "You get up on that stage and do us proud," - do your best (as we know you can) and make us proud.
     
  6. Englishmypassion

    Englishmypassion Senior Member

    Nainital
    India - Hindi
    Then why does Gen say it is not grammatically correct? I think an idiom/idiomatic usage should not be considered "incorrect" -- its being formal or informal is another thing.
    Though I wonder what Gen means by "grammatically" here and whether she means semantically rather than grammatically.
     
  7. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    I suspect this is a purely British idiom and AE speakers see it as a non-standard way of saying "make someone proud".:D I understand it as in post #5.
     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    So do I.
     
  9. Englishmypassion

    Englishmypassion Senior Member

    Nainital
    India - Hindi
    Thank you, Veli and SS. Would some AE speaker please tell us what they think of it?
    Thanks.
     
  10. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    While we're waiting for the AE speakers, here's what our house dictionary says about it:
     
  11. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    You got an American's opinion in post #4, which I totally agree with.
     
  12. Sparky Malarky

    Sparky Malarky Moderator

    Indiana
    English - US
    I agree that this is idiom, but I didn't realize it was British. It sounds quite normal to me, and I thought, if anything, it was a US Southern or Appalachian saying. Of course, many Appalachian words and sayings are British in origin.
     

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