1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

do what you're doing

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by frenchieee21, Oct 19, 2013.

  1. frenchieee21 New Member

    English - American
    A person said the Greek version of "do what you're doing," and it sounded something like "ah-geh-geh ah-ges," possibly with k's replacing some of the g's (as I'm not sure if I heard correctly). Does anyone know how to write the actual phrase in Greek? This might be ancient Greek.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    Hello,

    I'm afraid you must have misheard. In modern Greek it would be "κάνε ό,τι/αυτό που κάνεις" (sounding a bit like kane oti/afto pou kaneis). In ancient Greek probably something like "πράσσε ο πράσσεις" I guess (sounding a bit like prasse o prassis) though I haven't really thought the exact syntax through (I'm fairly certain he'd use the verb πράσσω/πράττω (prasso/prato) though).
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2013
  3. frenchieee21 New Member

    English - American
    Oh, that might be it! Could "κάνε ό κάνεις" work to mean anything like "do what you do"? That sounds similar from what you wrote.
     
  4. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    Hehe, you're mixing modern and ancient Greek. If he used something sounding like "κάνε", then he probably used "ό,τι". Note that Greek is spoken much faster than English (probably because most of our words are so much longer!) and very often they tend to merge. As a result, to the untrained ear, parts of the words sort of get "lost" if you know what I mean.
     
  5. bearded man

    bearded man Senior Member

    Milan
    Italian
    I think you might refer to the Latin expression ''Age quod agis'' meaning ''do what you do'': as a matter of fact, your translitaration ''ageh etc'' resembles more to the Latin than to the Greek. ''Age quod agis'' was a well-known recommendation during the Roman Empire, especially to the youths, meaning they should concentrate on their tasks. Unfortunately I do not know if there was an ancient ''official'' Greek translation of it.
     

Share This Page