Do you have any/some news for me?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by SwissJeremy, Sep 25, 2008.

  1. SwissJeremy Senior Member

    German-Swiss
    Hi,

    I just noticed that quite often "do you have some news?" is used even google shows more then 12 million hits. Why is it possible there to use some instead of any? Is there any difference in meaning?

    What about "do you have some time tomorrow?" Also possible right? but why...
     
  2. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Have a look at the threads listed in the WR dictionary under any some
    They should help.

    For example, here is a quote from one of them:
     
  3. SwissJeremy Senior Member

    German-Swiss
    Sorry but I already now those threats. It's more about those specifice sentences I mentioned before. I know that usally for questions which are not affimative any is used, but why is there some used?
     
  4. Melz0r Senior Member

    Suffolk, England
    English, England
    In that specific example, if I said, "Do you have some news for me?", it would mean I was expecting news, that I knew there was news and I wanted you to tell me what it was.

    "Do you have any news?" would mean there might not be any news. Hope this helps.
     
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The example sentences follow Brioche's explanation.

    Do you have any news for me? -> A general question when I don't expect any particular reply.
    Do you have some news for me? -> A more purposeful question - perhaps I am expecting to hear about exam results, the birth of a child, the results of some medical investigation, ...

    Do you have any time tomorrow? -> Suggests that I know you are always very busy.
    Do you have some time tomorrow? -> I'm expecting that you will have time tomorrow.

    The difference is not very strong - in many circumstances either would do.
     
  6. SwissJeremy Senior Member

    German-Swiss
    What about this situation:
    My friend is asking me: “What would you like to drink?”
    So I’m like: “Do you have some coke? / Do you have any coke?” ->I’m expecting/ hope that you have coke, so would you use the first one?
     
  7. Melz0r Senior Member

    Suffolk, England
    English, England
    “Do you have some coke? / Do you have any coke?”

    In this I'd say that there is no discernible difference in meaning. You've already established the context of asking for a drink, so whether or not you're expecting them to have coke doesn't really matter. I would say that "Do you have any coke?" is more natural.
     
  8. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I would never use the first one.
    I would ask either:
    Do you have coke?
    Do you have any coke?

    Do you have some coke?
    simply sounds bizarre.
     
  9. SwissJeremy Senior Member

    German-Swiss
    Any difference between: "do you have coke?" and "do you have any coke?"
     
  10. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    I was thinking about this sentence "do you have some coke?"... and I agree it sounds a little bit weird. But... what about "can I have some coke?". I found it quite natural, don't you??

    Why?
     
  11. SwissJeremy Senior Member

    German-Swiss
    Actually I'd like to know if there is a difference between these: "do you have coke?" and "do you have any coke?"
     
  12. Melz0r Senior Member

    Suffolk, England
    English, England
    In my opinion, the difference is negligible. If pressed to give a distinction:

    "Do you have coke?" - You don't go to the person's house often. You don't know what drinks they have. You're wondering if coke is one of the drinks they have.

    "Do you have any coke?" - You're fairly sure the person usually has coke, but you're wondering if they've got any left. Or you just want some coke, and this is a less blunt way of saying "I want some coke."

    However, I think they could be used interchangeably without sounding odd.
     

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