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don't get your panties/knickers in a twist/knot

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by lordterrin, Sep 10, 2009.

  1. lordterrin

    lordterrin Senior Member

    Sydney, Australia
    American English
    I've been looking around WR and the internet for a translation to this idiom but I can't find one anywhere. The basic idea is that you use this idiom to express the idea that someone should relax, or not get so worked up about something.

    For example, you're using the bathroom, and your brother is pounding at the door. You could say "I'm almost done!!! Don't get your panties in knot/bunch/twist!!!"

    Any natives out there with a similar French expression? :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. XPditif Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    français (France)
    Hey l.t.
    I've heard "détend/lâche le string",
    but I'm sure someone else knows the more common forms.
    ;)
     
  3. fäbie New Member

    Paris, France
    French
    the most usual saying in French might be :
    "T'affoles pas !", even if this is a little less familiar than the English phrase.
     
  4. xiancee

    xiancee Senior Member

    france
    French
    I have heard this expression used several times and found it quite amusing. I like Xpeditif translation which belongs to the same semantic series ! "T'excite pas" is also possible but another picturesque French equivalent still remains to be found.
     
  5. Lilymee New Member

    Bangkok
    French
    "Ne craque pas du slip/string" or "détends-toi du slip/string" but it's very colloquial
     
  6. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
  7. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    I must say I have never heard all the expressions with "slip/string" used like this, except maybe "détends-toi du string".
    Anyway, all these expressions are rather used by young people, while the English version doesn't seem so young to me.
    "T'excite pas" is what I would use. "(ne) t'énerve pas" would also be possibly, but neutral.

    As for "Il n'y a pas de quoi fouette un chat", I am afraid this wouldn't work in the example provded.
     
  8. bh7 Senior Member

    Limestone City
    Canada; English
    also: (ne) t'emballe pas; un peu de patience ! (keep calm, calm down, take it easy)
    quite more coarsely: (ne) fais pas un caca nerveux ! (don't soil your knickers; keep your pants on)
     

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