1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Don't let the door hit you where the good Lord split you

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by StacyS, Feb 13, 2006.

  1. StacyS New Member

    Paris, France
    U.S. English
    Hello,

    Is there a good way to translate this which would keep the meaning and also the rhythm/rhyme or "sassiness" of this phrase?

    Translation is not my area of expertise! :) Thank you!
     
  2. CARNESECCHI Senior Member

    Auvergne
    French / France
    Hello,
    Translation word by word :"Ne laisse pas cette porte te frapper là où le Bon Dieu t'a fendu". Means 'go out fast enough so the door will not hit your bottom while swinging'. A rough equivalent could be "Dégage en vitesse, avant de prendre la porte dans la gueule!!". Sorry, I did not find an expression with God but the mouth is also a place split by Him.
    Enjoy french !
     
  3. StacyS New Member

    Paris, France
    U.S. English
    No, it doesn't need to be a literal translation, just an equivalent in proper French with something of the same spirit. Thanks for your help!
     
  4. Kaichou Junior Member

    New England
    American English (New England)
    Hi, I know this is nearly ten years later but I figured that responding here would be better than starting a new thread on the same exact phrase.

    Anyways, I was wondering if it would be OK to also translate this phrase as: ''Ne laisse pas la porte te frapper où le Bon Dieu t'a scindé"

    This way the rhyme can be maintained... I just don't know if it sounds awkward to use scindé in this sense. Any suggestions from native speakers?
     
  5. Nau Kofi Junior Member

    France/Français
    Ne laisse pas la porte te frapper où le Bon Dieu t'a scindé is awkward in french - what's the meaning in english ?
     
  6. Lucky19 Senior Member

    Brive
    Français de France
    ce que je ne comprends pas dans cette expression est la partie "...où le Bon Dieu t'a scindé/fendu". Fendu ? pourquoi fendu (ou équivalent) ?
     
  7. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Si tu te regardes dans un miroir, en tournant le dos, tu verras qu'il existe une fente entre les fesses...

    Mais j'avoue que, à la première vue, je ne l'avais pas compris non plus. Un américanisme et peut-être pas des plus communs ?
     
  8. Lucky19 Senior Member

    Brive
    Français de France
    Ah ok ! Effectivement, une fois l'explication donnée, c'était évident.

    ...là où le bon Dieu t'a mis/collé une raie ?
     
  9. Kaichou Junior Member

    New England
    American English (New England)
    Selon ce que j'ai entendu : On n'a vraiment pas à tourner le dos. On est divisé en deux aux jambes, alors on dirait que c'est à l'entrejambe où le Bon Dieu l'a scindé/fendu/etc. En conséquent, la phrase en question veut dire vraiment, "Ne laisse pas la porte te frapper aux couilles !" C'est sensé d'être une phrase drôle qui se dit entre des amis.

    Mais peut-être ce que j'ai entendu n'est pas correct. Si c'est le cas, j'aime bien la traduction que Lucky a donné.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2015
  10. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    I don't recall hearing that version of the expression before - I'm used to this one Don't let the door hit you on the way out - but SD Graham mentioned it there, too. Since it's an English Only thread there's no suggested translation, but the explanations are good. (It's a snarky way to say oh, good, you're leaving, or hurry up and leave, will you?)
     
  11. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    @ KellyB, "Don't let the door hit you in the ass on your way out" - in other words, "(Just) get the hell out already!" "Fuck off!"
     

Share This Page