don't touch my junk

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by D45, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. I just went through security at the San Diego CA airport this week end... The phrase "don't touch my junk" has surfaced out of an incident there last week. I translate this phrase as:

    ¡No toque mi chatarra!

    Is this OK or should it be ¡No toque mis trastos?

    TNX

    DB
     
  2. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2010
  3. Hmmm.. It's a slang expression for Don't touch my "private Parts" so I'm not sure where to so with it. I'm a second year adult student having fun with the learning process and was using the TSA search as a learning experience! :)

    db
     
  4. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    las partes íntimas o simplemente "las partes" No me toques las partes

    Personal opinion: Latins have more respect for their private parts than to refer to them as "junk" ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010
  5. Gracias scotu.

    Mis partes has a nice sound to it but it's almost too exact! I believe trastos can mean "stuff", "gear" or "tackle" which might be a better fit for a slang expression.

    ¡No sé!

    db

    I just read your comment on respect. Good point! :)
     
  6. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Coincido.
    The origin of this meaning of the word has nothing to do with a lack of respect. "Junk" has been slang for "stuff, things" since the 1950's in the US, in which context it has no pejorative meaning at all, and can be and often is used to refer to things that are far from being literal junk.

    Ex.:
    -Where are all your paintings now that you have moved?
    -All my junk is at my girlfriend's.
     
  7. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    Por acá también usamos "mis presas".
     
  8. grubble

    grubble Senior Member

    South of England, UK
    British English
    But not in the UK! I didn't understand the phrase until it was explained.
     
  9. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    The point that I was trying to make is that the word "junk" meaning male genitalia in one slang sense of the word, does not, to the best of my limited knowledge, translate well into Spanish. There must be some Spanish slang words for male genitalia (junk/package/basket) But I cant think of any off hand????
     
  10. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I still think your "mis partes" is a good translation, both in meaning and in general register.
     
  11. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    I agree, although I think it is not restricted to male genitalia.
     
  12. Lurrezko

    Lurrezko Senior Member

    Junto al mar
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    In Spain no me toques el paquete.
     
  13. ¡Mil gracias!

    I just got back from dinner and checked the posts! It looks like "¡No toques mi paquete!" - "Don't touch my package!" is a good fit/choice.

    (=genitales masculinos) bulge, lunchbox from http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/paquete

    I really getting some good vocab from this post and I appreciate it.

    db
     
  14. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
  15. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    I may be an excellent choice in Spain, but I am afraid it wouldn't be understood around here. It would seem that "mis partes" is fairly "universal", while "mi paquete", "mis presas", and others, may be amusing local variations.
     
  16. Lurrezko

    Lurrezko Senior Member

    Junto al mar
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    The "universal" idiom is no me toques las partes, as Oldynuts says, although el paquete is not amusing at all, it's just Spanish slang. In any case, the construction with paquete is not no toques mi paquete, but no me toques el paquete.
     
  17. sacacorchos New Member

    Spanish, Spain
    Hello, hola :)

    Slang phrase for that expression in Spain and very common used too should be something like "No me toques los huevos" or "No me toques los cojones" where huevos/cojones = balls

    Both of them are very rude but so concise, direct and clear.

    Paquete is also a slang use in Spain wich means the same but I don't find "No me toques el paquete" very "natural" or something I could say in a rage. It sounds weird to me...

    Hope this helps ;)
     
  18. Lurrezko

    Lurrezko Senior Member

    Junto al mar
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Pero aquí hay dos contextos diferentes: no me toques los huevos/los cojones para significar no me molestes/importunes, etc. Sin embargo, en el contexto que propone el hilo, en un registro o cacheo, cuando alguien te va a tocar literalmente las partes, yo no diría eso en ningún caso, sino no me toques el paquete.
     
  19. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Pero esas expresiones tienen un registro muy distinto a el del original, el cual no es solamente argot, sino que es un eufemismo, y no es tan directo o claro (o grosero).

    Sigo creyendo que la traducción más adecuada es "No me toques las partes" en este contexto específico.
     
  20. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    Por acá no se usa "no me toques los huevos/cojones" pero, de oirlo, yo pensaría que es equivalente a nuestro "no me huevees", cuyo significado es totalmente distinto al de no desear que le metan mano a tus órganos sexuales, además de ser muy vulgar.

    Sigo concordando totalmente con gengo en este caso. Y recuedo a D45 que, cualquiera que sea la expresión que elija, la forma es "no me toques las/el...", como se le ha dicho varias veces, y no la que él insiste en usar, "no toques mis/mi..."
     
  21. Thanks for the reply. I'm a little confused about why I should use las/el... and not mis/mi.. if I'm talking about "my junk". When I talk about my house it's mi casa not la casa I think???

    By the way, here's the incident that got me started:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/18/AR2010111804494.html

    db
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010
  22. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    This is a characteristic of Spanish that differs from English. It is common with body parts.

    My head hurts = Me duele la cabeza
    I twisted my wrist = Me torcí la muñeca
    etc.
     
  23. Thanks gengo. I''ll try to learn more about that one.

    db
     

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