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dos dedos de ponello en duda

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Scorny, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. Scorny Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    Could someone help me understand the meaning of this phrase taken from the thirteenth chapter, Book I, of Don Quijote? What is the actual meaning of the phrase and could someone explain the usage of ponello here? How would ponello be expressed in modern Spanish as it is used in this passage?

    Tan estrecha bien podía ser, respondió nuestro don Quijote; pero tan necesaria en el mundo, no estoy en dos dedos de ponello en duda.

    My guess is that no estoy en dos dedos de ponello en duda means to be doubtful about something, but I don't understand the "dos dedos" (two fingers) reference.

    Obviously this is for someone with knowledge of 16th and 17th century Spanish language. Thanks for any assistance on this.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  2. Junosama New Member

    Puerto Rico
    Spanish
    Hi! I am Argentinian and I have read the text before. In my opinion: no estoy en dos dedos de ponello en duda : I need very little (only two fingers) to doubt about...

    Ponello (ponerlo -> poner (put) lo (Indirect Object) Put it in the Imperative form.

    I looked this site for you, it is an analysis of phrases on that text. I like Don Quijote!

    Good Luck, hope it helps!
     
  3. vertebrado Senior Member

    espanol (Espana)
    Significa: No tengo ninguna duda de que es necesaria en el mundo.
    It means: he has not the slightest doubt/hesitation on how necessary that is.
     
  4. Scorny Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    Thanks Junosama! I don't see the site you are referring to - maybe you forgot to include it, but thanks for the explanation. So ponello today would have the equivalent of ponlo or pongalo? Since this work was written in 1605, the second person both formal/informal was in a state of flux and rather than pon or ponga - poned may have been used? So rather than ponedlo it was ponello? Does this sound correct? It seems to me (although I am not a native speaker and I am unfamiliar with this phrase) that the imperative is not being employed in this case. Maybe it is simply ponello = ponerlo.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  5. Scorny Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    Thanks vertebrado. I did not find this phrase anywhere in the wordreference archive or in other sources I use as a reference. I am thinking its usage is obsolete or archaic, as is the usage of ponello.
     
  6. vertebrado Senior Member

    espanol (Espana)
    indeed, ponello is archaic. Now we say ponerlo.
     
  7. Scorny Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    Thanks all. I got it.
     
  8. Junosama New Member

    Puerto Rico
    Spanish
  9. Scorny Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    Gracias Junosama! this site will be very useful, estoy seguro.
     
  10. Maximino Senior Member

    Santiago de Chile
    Español chileno
    ‘No estoy en dos dedos de ponello en duda’ es equivalente a 'me falta muy poco (dos dedos) para ponerlo en duda'.

    Fuente


    Saludos
     

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