down as brown

Discussion in 'English Only' started by In-Su, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. In-Su Junior Member

    nowhere and now here
    France French
    I read this in a Youtube comment. A chess commentator analyzed a game by another commentator and somebody suggested that the two play against each other.

    He replied,
    I'm assuming this phrase means totally willing, eager for it. Is that right? I didn't get any really pertinent results using Google.
     
  2. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    Your interpretation sounds likely, In-Su (though I must confess to never having heard this expression). Note that it rhymes. Some native speakers see rhyming as being important.

    I found this somewhere. I'd say it supports your theory:
    I think it means they're as keen as mustard.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  3. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    I've never heard this either. I understand it immediately as meaning "I'm waaaaaay down" (I'm really down, I would do it in a heartbeat).

    Rhyming is often used in English for emphasis, and it doesn't have to make sense. For instance, when you say "as loose as a goose" you mean "really, really loose" - and you don't actually mean to imply that geese are loose in any way!
     
  4. In-Su Junior Member

    nowhere and now here
    France French
    Thanks for your replies.
     
  5. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    That said, a goose is actually quite loose.
     
  6. Man_from_India Senior Member

    Indian English
    Can anyone please explain that "rhyming theory for emphasis", as it might help to create one's own. Thanking you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  7. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    MFI, this thread's about 'down as brown'. Yours is an interesting question that deserves a thread of its own. I recommend you start one.
     
  8. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    (1) I wouldn't have the faintest idea what this meant.
    (2) I wouldn't take the English posted in YouTube comments as in any way indicative of Good or even Fair English.
     

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