down the center of the 'draft'

Discussion in 'English Only' started by acid...burn, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Hello everybody,

    I'm analizing the screenplay of The Lord of the Rings and I see this sentence: "There is a small brook that bubbles down the center of the draft."

    I really don't understand the meaning of DRAFT in this sentence.

    If someone can help me...

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    My first guess is that it's a typo. Could you give us some more context and be a little more exact (The Lord of the Rings refers to three different movies)? Is this an official script or a transcript that someone has written while watching the movie or ...?
     
  3. I thought it was a typo too, but further in the screenplay, in the same scene, it's also written "draft".

    Here's a bit more of the scene if it can help and if you know the movie it's THE TWO TOWERS, the extended version when Pippin is drinking Ent water ;-)

    "Sunlight breaks through a few of the trees giving light. A small brook bubbles down the center of the draft. PIPPIN sits on a root, drinking the water.

    WIDE ON: MERRY looks out into the dark forest beyond the draft."
     
  4. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I can think of no meaning of the word draft that has the slightest relevance here. It's definitely not used this way in the LOTR books.

    I wonder if it's a movie-making term?
     
  5. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Well, it may not be a typo, per se, but it could be incorrect. You would need to compare the script to the actual spoken text in the movie.

    Just about every real script has spelling and usage errors when in all drafts. Take a look at Quentin Tarantino's sometime; he is borderline illiterate. ;)

    It very well could be an incorrect usage that made it on to the script, but was just plain wrong.
     
  6. I can confirm it's not a movie-making term, I'm screenwriter and director so I confirm it's not ^_^
     
  7. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I don't think this is dialogue - I think it's some sort of script direction. Edit: I am sure you know a lot more about this stuff than I do, then, Acid, but that is how it reads. But if it isn't movie-making jargon, I have to agree with the others that it's an error. There really is no definition of draft that fits here - not that I've ever heard of, anyway.

    (Cross-posted with Acid...burn.)
     
  8. Actually, the sentences I shown are in the screenplays as actions to describe the scene, not dialogues, so I cannot compare that to the spoken text, ^_^

    So, you too thiunk it's nonense in this context?!

    Thank you for your help!
     
  9. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    If you're a screenwriter, then you know that all scripts have at least a few grammatical and spelling errors. Words are often misused as well. :)

    I do believe is was a misused word. Working in film, you know that directors/DP's are FULL of them. ;)
     
  10. Of course, though here, this is not a grammatical or spelling error as the whole word is nonense regarding the context and yet it's written twice. And as there are some words I don't know in English, I thought that perhaps... it was one of them ;-)
     
  11. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Yes, but I also said "misused word". ;) I believe it was a misused word. :)
     
  12. Certainly yes. Thank you to confirmed that ;-)
     
  13. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Before any conclusions are made, I notice that all of the replies, thus far, have been AmE speakers. It might be best to wait for a native BrE or NzE speaker to come along and comment. :)
     
  14. I will. Thanks! :)
     
  15. I found by chance this:

    "Ent-draught (The American English version of "draught" is "draft"):appearing in The Lord of the Rings (The Two Towers), an Ent-draught was an extremely invigorating drink of the Ents, brewed from the waters of the mountain springs on Methedras. "

    It explains everything!
     
  16. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    No it doesn't. Draught is what I immediately thought of when I learnt it was set in Fangorn. I was trying to find a way how it could be a search-and-replace error (as it occurs multiple times), with the alternative spelling replacing one of the words used to describe the place (hall, bower, space) itself. I still haven't thought of a way that draught/draft could get into that position.
     
  17. I didn't understand myself, but as the title of the scene is "EXT. ENT DRAFT", then, perhas they're using that word as a location in the screenplay (even though it's said to be a beverage). But I must say it's very confusing ^^
     
  18. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    So . . . someone there thinks a draft is a hall or bower?? :rolleyes:
     
  19. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    Has this been answered yet?
     
  20. As said previousy, it's the original screenplay (no transcript) from the movie ;-)
     
  21. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Hullo, everyone.

    This is what The Webster Third New International Dictionary of THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE UNABRIDGED gives me:

    draft, n [...] 16 a chiefly Midland: GULLY, GORGE b Midland: a small stream: CREEK [...]

    Best.

    GS
     
  22. Wow! Thanks a lot for your help!!!
     
  23. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    In the book, there is indeed a small stream in the Ent hall, so I think we've got a winner.
     
  24. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Giorgio's meaning is in the OED, too (entry for "draught"):
    Perhaps it's common in NZ English?
     
  25. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Maybe it's not relevant, but I left out the alternative spelling when typing the headword:

    draft or draught n [...] 16 a chiefly Midland: GULLY, GORGE b Midland: a small stream: CREEK [...]

    GS
     
  26. Yes but the problem is it's said "a small brook bubbles down the draft"... brook referring already to a small stream.
     
  27. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    Oh, man, you are right, Acid - sorry, I missed that. "A small brook bubbles down the creek" makes zero sense. Hmmm, what if it is a kind of typo then - the person originally wrote "draft" meaning "brook," changed it to "brook" but then forgot to delete "draft"? I've done that kind of thing lots of times before and I've seen it done by a lot of other people, too, including in professionally edited books. You'd think that sort of thing wouldn't happen with the script of a major motion picture, but I would be very surprised if it didn't.

    Edit: Unless the meaning is "gully"? That appears to be possible, according to the listing Giorgio found. I've never heard of it before, but eh, I haven't heard of everything.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2013
  28. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Yes, but you two are only looking at one part of the definition Giorgio gave.
    Look at the first part.

    draft, n [...] 16 a chiefly Midland: GULLY, GORGE

    So it's a small brook going down a gully/gorge.
     
  29. Hehe, don't be sorry ^^
    I think I'll say it's a typo because we're going in circle... OR it's a sort of location simply called "DRAF" as the scene refers to the Ent Draft... curious, curious!
    Oh well, you say "You'd think that sort of thing wouldn't happen with the script of a major motion picture, but I would be very surprised if it didn't"... indeed! It happens A LOT! I lastly read 7 major film screenplays and it's incredible to see so many typo, grammatical errors etc... the craziest is when you know that being a screenwriter, you cannot write any typoe nor errors in a script if you want to sell it, haha ^_^
     
  30. Yes, yes, true! I forgot that...! ^^
     

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