Dragoste and Iubire

Discussion in 'Română (Romanian)' started by mavritivs, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. mavritivs

    mavritivs New Member

    Earth
    English
    Firstly, I would like to know if there is any real difference between dragoste and iubire. Secondly, I would like to know how this compares, if it does, to the Spanish "querer" and "amar" verbs.

    (The sort of Spanish "hierarchy" could be thought of "querer" being in between liking someone and loving someone.)

    Thank you.
     
  2. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    It has been discussed before, though not very extensively, here.
     
  3. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    As nouns, I don't think we make any difference between them. They are both of Slavic origin. Things start to change when dealing with the adjectives and verbs derived from them.

    For example, drag (dragă, fem.) and iubit (iubită, fem) are something like dear and lover (I'm purposely mixing and matching a bit the nouns and the adjectives here).

    With the verbs things are getting slightly more complicated: drag gets a prefix becoming a îndrăgi (to get to like something or someone) where the other verb is a iubi (to love).

    We also have the noun amor (love) of latin origin but strangely enough nowadays it's mostly (only?) used in an ironic/sarcastic way. There are two verbs associated/derived from this noun: a se înamora and a se amoreza - they are not widely used (considered dated) and mainly in a sarcastic way. There is also an adjective, amorezat, which means to be in love (dated).

    Last but not list the verb a plăcea (to like from lat. placere) can be used to cover the whole register from just like a person to really, really like or love them.


    Later,

    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
  4. mavritivs

    mavritivs New Member

    Earth
    English
    I actually started this thread after reading the post suggesting a thread ought to be started for separate discussion of the difference between those two terms.

    ====

    farscape: Thank you very much, very interesting indeed.
     
  5. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    The correct form is a plăcea - my bad.

    f.

    .
     
  6. Lilleulv New Member

    Norwegian
    My boyfriend is calling me Iubire. Can I Call him Dragoste back? I am always struggeling with the gender-thing:)
     
  7. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    I'd suggest 'dragostea mea' (literally "my love") although it has a more serious, involved overtone :) whereas "iubire" stand alone is a bit more... casual. That's all based on common usage and users :)

    Later,
    .
     
  8. Trisia

    Trisia mod de viață

    București
    Romanian
    Agreed. I'd say that in my experience calling someone "iubire" is the approximate equivalent of "baby", while "dragostea mea" is more intense.
     
  9. Lilleulv New Member

    Norwegian
    Thank you!!:)
     
  10. irinet

    irinet Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Good for your minor correction: the verb is "a plăcea", 2nd type of conjugation, not 3rd as "a face".
     
  11. irinet

    irinet Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Of course you may call him "dragostea mea", you may succesfully use "iubi" (with a stress on the 1st syllable), a short form of "iubire", more like a pet word!
    That's the beauty of this word, it is more flexible and easier to 'model' when loving someone. That is the reason, your interlocutors here have told you that this word is colloquial and can be used with various registers: ironic, sarcasting, but also petting the dear one. Similarly, when using this noun, you may be very creative, for instance, "iubiric". This is a new one, and I love it.
     
  12. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    Word of caution: iubiric is not in the dictionary (yet?!). If we really have to, iubițel (masc.) and iubițică (fem.) are. I can't believe I'm writing this. :eek:

    Best,
    .
     
  13. pal.elena New Member

    romanian
    In my opinion, dragostea mea adds a little more dramma to the context, whereas love is the ecquivallent of baby, honey etc. And I guess we can all agree that iubiric, iubiţel and iubiţică should not be in our vocabullary, maybe only as a mockery:))
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2013
  14. irinet

    irinet Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Wow, since when we should ban the use of these words while expressing our love to the dearest one? This would mean that love is standardised, and what I know is that it is not about playing by any rules!
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013

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