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drama

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by NotNow, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. NotNow Senior Member

    English
  2. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Offhand, I can offer 'teatr' (sometimes 'teatrzyk' to add (more) irony to it), but please wait for comments by other members to see if they know it.

    EDIT: also 'scena' and 'mieć jazdy', and sometimes perhaps even 'maniana', but they have wider meanings than the English word.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  3. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    The closest one I can think of is "bajkopisarstwo". The person is called a "bajkopisarz" (actually my neighbor is one, you wouldn't believe what stories he can make up ).
    I'm sure though it can vary widely depending on the region.
     
  4. BezierCurve Senior Member

    I'd use "teatr", "teatrzyk" or "scena" as suggested by Thomas (usually following "robić" or "zrobić" = "to make").

    Another word would be "szopka", although that can also carry a slightly different meaning.
     
  5. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    That's just occured to me too. :)

    To add more verbs to the ones given by Bezier: odstawić, odwalić (they are more colloquial, the last one being even slang, I think).
     
  6. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Hmm that's interesting. To me these expressions quite differ from the definition given in the link.
    On second thought though a lot depends on the context which we're rid of here.
     
  7. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    How would one say, There's a lot of drama at John's house?

    Everyone at John's is arguing and overreacting to things.
     
  8. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    At first I wasn't quite sure what is exactly meant by saying that there is a lot of drama at one's house, but now that you have offered an additional explanation...

    W domu Johna panuje napięta atmosfera. --> that's the best I can think of. It's formal, though. I'm struggling to come up with something informal. :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  9. BezierCurve Senior Member

    In the above case the most natural to me would be:

    U Johna w domu ciągle są jakieś sceny.
     
  10. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    Perfect, Bezier!

    Would this be readily understood by everyone? The English expression is very, very common.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  11. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    By all means. Both Dreamlike's and Bezier's suggestions are perfectly acceptable to me.
    However I have an impression that the English definition is much more complicated than that and conveys more than the Polish expressions.
     
  12. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    To me, 'sceny' does not communicate the idea of a constantly arguing family very well -- it's a very vague word and I'd probably ask the speaker for clarification, but mind you, this might be just me. :)
     
  13. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Yes, it should be, it's common enough to be understood by most Polish speakers.
    You could also say: W domu Johna często dochodzi do scen. [This is a more formal version of Bezier's suggestion.]
    W domu Johna często urządzają/robią sceny.

    EDIT: I've just seen Dreamlike's post above and must say that I haven't expected 'scena' to be unknown. Especially that it made its way into dictionaries:
    EDIT2: I've just remembered 'scysja', which can also be used in the sentence in hand: W domu Johna często dochodzi do scysji.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  14. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Does "scena" convey the idea of purposeful attracting other people's attention for example?
     
  15. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Very much so. As in 'Nie rób scen'.

    Having given it some thought and having asked around, it is indeed a perfect suggestion. I had a momentary lapse of reason. :eek:
     
  16. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    To my experience, yes, it can.
    EDIT: darn it, Dreamlike beat me to it.
     
  17. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    I see. I must say I see it a bit differently.

    A marital row:
    - Ile razy mówiłem ci, że masz nie kupować takiego drogiego jedzenia, do jasnej cholery?!
    - Janek, proszę, nie rób scen, bo sąsiedzi znowu nas usłyszą.

    Now, let's take an excerpt from the definition provided by NotNow:
    I don't know about you but to me it doesn't exactly correlate with the situation I provided where 'scena' fits in perfectly. Maybe I misunderstand that definition of 'drama' though... :confused:
     
  18. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    The definition is rather vague. Everyone seems to have his own interpretation.

    It just occurred to me, there used to be some drama in this forum, but it most of it stopped when someone was banned.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  19. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    It does not correlate with the situation you have provided, not even in the slightest. But in post #7 NotNow gave a different definition of this 'drama' thing, and your dialogue could well describe a drama going on at some Polish house. Or should I say 'sceny'. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  20. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    NotNow, what other verbs than 'use' (found at the site you linked to, see below) can you employ with 'drama'?
    Would 'stir up' fit in?
     
  21. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Exactly, NotNow, it's vague. Do you think you could come up with a few different contexts in which 'drama' could be employed?
     
  22. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    Yes, it would fit, but someone who stirs up drama is called a drama queen, regardless of gender. I would say it this way: Sarah is such a drama queen that she told everyone she's deathly ill.

    Some examples of how the word is used:

    Don't be a drama queen.
    She lives for drama.
    He hates school because of all the drama.
    The drama starts the minute John walks in the room.
    All the drama broke up their marriage.
    His mother's drama drives him to drinking.
    Drama turns him off.
    I can live without the drama.
    Drama won't help.
    Drama creates an unwholesome environment for children.
    Her drama gets old.

    I hear these expressions, or something close to them, everyday.


     
  23. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Is it possibly more AmE or solely AmE? I'm familiar with 'drama queen' but 'drama' in this meaning is quite new to me.
     
  24. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    I have heard these in the UK too.
     
  25. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I would think, it is only similar to patos. Wiele patosu w ich życiu, just as an example.
     
  26. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    'Patos' is something completely different. It's loftiness, solemnity which doesn't really fit in this context.
     
  27. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    No, it is not. Patos can also mean unnecessary drama -- with the meaning of exaggerating things and living by pretenses. The second meaning of patos is means something exactly like that. (meant with some sarcasm). This meaning of patos is even more common, I think, than the original meaning, as in The Pathetic Symphony.(something grand, evoking vehement feelings, festive).

    http://sjp.pwn.pl/slownik/2570934/patos

    Related to the third meaning here -- patos w czyimś życiu is very close to the English drama, from NotNow's example.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  28. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    I'm sorry but I couldn't disagree more. In my opinion the definition from the Polish dictionary in no way correlates with the English one from the UD.
    I'm curious, though, what others think about it.
     
  29. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I entirely agree with R.O. Patos is not the word to be used here. I doubt others will differ.
    The word 'drama' may well sometimes translate into Polish as 'patos', but not as used by NotNow.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  30. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Maybe it is not a part of the contemporary youth vocabulary, but it is a good option here. It would be good to know who NotNow's audience is.
     
  31. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    I hang with the in crowd.
     

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