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dull

Discussion in 'English Only' started by CORALINNA, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. CORALINNA Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brasil
    "All work and no play makes managers dull conference participants. So the venue's got to provide a wide choice of leisure activities."

    source: Market Leader - New Pre-Intermediate - Listening 6.6


    I didn't understand this sentence, maybe because of "dull". Is dull a verb or an adjective here?
     
  2. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It's a play on the idiom: 'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy'.
    Dull​ is an adjective.
     
  3. perpend Senior Member

    American English
    Just to provide confirmation from the American English point of view. I fully agree with natkretep.
     
  4. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Since every word in the sentence carries its dictionary definition, I would call it an aphorism, not an idiom.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    idiom /ˈɪdɪəm/n
    • a group of words whose meaning cannot be predicted from the meanings of the constituent words, as for example (It was raining)cats and dogs


    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    aphorism /ˈæfəˌrɪzəm/n
    • a short pithy saying expressing a general truth; maxim

     
  5. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Thanks, SDG. I'm very happy to call it an aphorism. (Or an adage. Or more generally a saying.) :D
     

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