duodeviginti

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by William Stein, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. William Stein Senior Member

    San Jose, Costa Rica
    American English
    Can anybody please explain the logic behind duodeviginti = eighteen? I speak all the major Romance languages and none of them follow that pattern (it's always "décimo octavo", "dix-huitième", or something like that). Does duodeviginti literally mean "two from twenty" = 20-2 or something? Is there any alternative form that was copied by all the Romance languages?
     
  2. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    Those are ordinal forms; duodeviginti and undeviginti are cardinals. Latin also had the additive forms octodecim and novendecim/novemdecim, but as far as I know, they didn't survive into Romance, either.

    Check out the following EHL thread for some earlier discussion:
    Latin 18,19
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  3. William Stein Senior Member

    San Jose, Costa Rica
    American English
    It's true that "duodeviginti" and "undeviginti" are cardinals but that's not really relevant to my point because Romance languages still don't follow the pattern: "dieciocho (ten-and-eight) or "dix-huit" (ten-eight), etc., nothing to do with twenty.

    Anyway, thanks for the link, that's very interesting, especially the IIXX version of 18.
     

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