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Dutch or Netherlands nationality

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Telemaco53, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Hello,

    I am a bit confuse about the terms Dutch and Netherlands to refer to the nationality or holder of a passport. The Dutch are the etnic group from The Netherlands, however they are nationals from The Kingdom of The Netherlands. Aruba and The Netherlands Antilles are also part of The Kingdom of The Nederlands and the people there hold the same nationality and passport, however they are not Dutch.

    Would it be more correct to say "Netherlands nationality" than "Dutch nationality"?

    I hope somebody can help me.
     
  2. Richard_UK>Valencia Senior Member

    Valencia
    English (British)
    We normally say that someone is Dutch, is from the Netherlands, is a Dutch national or holds a Dutch passport.
     
  3. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Thanks Richard,

    but would you say that somebody from Aruba has Dutch nationality?
    That sounds a bit bizarre to me... How would you address an Aruban in that respect?
     
  4. Richard_UK>Valencia Senior Member

    Valencia
    English (British)
  5. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Well, in Spanish you could make a distinction. You could say:
    "él es holandés y ella es arubana, ambos tienen nacionalidad neerlandesa".

    I think that one thing is what is common to say, and other what is correct or more proper.

    In Dutch language they say "nederlandse nationaliteit" wich is also clear, although they translate it into English as "Dutch" and the problem starts.

    Probably, in English, it is a situation so rare that there is no clear definition.

    Cheers
     
  6. octoplasm Senior Member

    Utopia
    Spanish/English
    The term "Netherlands nationality," or anything resembling that, is not used in North America.

    What context are you referring to, so that we can help you better?
     
  7. jinti

    jinti Senior Member

    Arubans are Dutch citizens or have Dutch citizenship.
     
  8. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi Octoplasm,

    I understand that the term is not used, but is it incorrect?
    My girlfriend is from Aruba and she wants to write a résumé in English.
    She has it in Dutch (nationaliteit: nederlands) and Spanish (nacionalidad: neerlandesa).
    Does it make sense to say that she has Dutch nationality when the term Dutch only refers to the citizens of Holland?

    Thanks
     
  9. Richard_UK>Valencia Senior Member

    Valencia
    English (British)
    Most people wouldn't know where Aruba was if you asked them, so I think Dutch is the only sensible option!
     
  10. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi Richard,

    haha, maybe you are right :)
    But what really puzzles me is that we live in Holland (where everybody knows where is Aruba) and no body considers my girlfriend as Dutch...

    Cheers man
     
  11. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
  12. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Many Dutch are not Germanic, and that doesn't make them any less Dutch. "Netherlands nationality" doesn't make any sense; if anything it would be "Netherlandic nationality", which isn't used either.
     
  13. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi Filis Cañí,

    I share your point, but are the Dutch (from Holland) who keep on telling me that my girlfriend is not Duch but she's Aruban...
     
  14. afterlife Senior Member

    US, Spanish/English
    Telémaco,
    I don't see why it's so important to give so many specifics in a resume.
    Most Americans do know where Aruba is. It's a popular vacation destination for many.

    I would just say: Aruban national, Dutch citizen.

    As an alternative she can always ask her friends, former teachers, whatever, what they normally write on their resumes. It shouldn't be too complicated.
     
  15. afterlife Senior Member

    US, Spanish/English
    That's just prejudice on their part. It shouldn't affect an English-language resume.
     
  16. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi afterlife,

    thanks for your comments
     
  17. Richard_UK>Valencia Senior Member

    Valencia
    English (British)
    This is my last post on this topic.

    I would recommend to your girlfriend to edit her CV depending on to whom she is sending it. For example:
    * if it is for someone in the US who would know where Aruba is, then put what Afterlife suggests;
    * if it is for someone in the Netherlands, then probably do the same; however
    * if it is for use in Europe (outside the Netherlands), just use Dutch.

    Hope she is successful in whatever she's writing it for!
     
  18. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Thank you all for your comments!
     
  19. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Deben estar hablando de nomenclaturas administrativas internas de los holandeses, no de nacionalidades. En inglés, creo que no hay más adjetivo que Dutch para referirse a alguien de nacionalidad holandesa, aunque Dutch signifique también otras cosas. También queda el recurso de poner Nationality: The Netherlands.
     
  20. Telemaco53 New Member

    The Netherlands
    Spanish - Spain
    Después de todos los cometarios ha quedado claro que los ciudadanos de Aruba y de Antillas Neerlandesas son "Dutch".

    Creeme, los holandeses (de Holanda) en su gran mayoría no les consideran "Dutch" y nisiquera saben que tienen la misma nacionalidad (prueba a preguntarle a algún holandés). Pero eso no tiene nada quer ver con términos linguísticos, si no con prejuicios e ignorancia, pero bueno, ese tema es más apropiado en otros foros...

    Un saludo.
     

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