EA: verbs in -eet/-et + Consonant

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by AlJaahil, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. AlJaahil Junior Member

    Vancouver
    Canadian English
    Hi, all -

    Quick pronunciation query: verbs ending in -eet like *(ana/enta) Habbeet" vs. the same verbs ending in -et like *(heyya) Habbet*, when followed by an ending that begins with a consonant: are they all pronounced the same, e.g. *(ana/enta/heyya) Habbethom* or is there some difference in pronunciation - and, is there dialect variation?

    I'd thought they were all the same but T. Mitchell in his book *Colloquial Arabic* (which teaches Egyptian Arabic) somewhat unclearly seems to say that -eet is reduced at least sometimes to -at not -et, so *(ana/enta) Habbathom* vs. *(heyya) Habbethom*.

    Any help for the terminally confused most welcome. :D
     
  2. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    It's a long e in both cases not an i.
     
  3. AlJaahil Junior Member

    Vancouver
    Canadian English
    Hrrr, I think my use of *ee* confused the issue, let me try with IPA and Arabic script. :)

    What I'm asking about is doubled or final-weak verbs in the past tense when they take both subject and object suffixes that start with consonants.

    E.g. حبّيت [ ħæbˈbeːt ] "I/you (male) loved" + ها [ hæ ] "her," vs. حبّت [ ˈħæbbet ] "she loved" + ها [ hæ ] "her."

    In most sources I've seen, both forms turn into the identical [ ħæbˈbethæ ], but Mitchell's book says that حبّت + ها "she loved her" is pronounced [ ħæbˈbethæ ] as expected but that حبّيت + ها "I/you (male) loved her" is pronounced [ ħæbˈbæthæ ] as if written حبَّتها with *fat7a*.

    Is this common? Old? Dialect? Agnabi jus' trippin'? :D
     
  4. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

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    It's fine - what may be confusing you is that Egyptians often shorten what are perceived to be long vowels.
     
  5. AlJaahil Junior Member

    Vancouver
    Canadian English
    I get that part, it's what they shorten them to that's confusing.

    So again, does "I loved her" sound the same as "she loved her," or slightly different?
     
  6. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

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    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)

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