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Each/every

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Santos, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Santos New Member

    Spain/Spanish
    Hello everybody:
    Can anyone tell me the difference between "each" and "every".
    Thanks a lot. ;)
     
  2. Nicole New Member

    Germany
    UK
  3. el alabamiano Senior Member

    Alabama
    each
    pronoun, determiner

    every thing, person, etc. in a group of two or more, considered separately:
    When you run, each foot leaves the ground before the other comes down.
    There are five leaflets - please take one of each.
    Each of the companies supports a local charity.
    Each and every one of the flowers has its own colour and smell.
    We each (= Every one of us) wanted the bedroom with the balcony, so we tossed a coin to decide.
    The bill comes to £79, so that's about £10 each.
    each to his/their own (MAINLY US to each their own)

    used to say that everyone likes different things:
    You actually like modern jazz, do you? Each to their own.

    be meant for each other
    If you say two people are meant for each other, you think they suit each other as romantic partners.


    every (ALL)
    determiner

    used when referring to all the members of a group of three or more:
    The police want to interview every employee about the theft.
    The show will be broadcast every weekday morning between 9 and 10.
    We're open every day except Sunday.
    I've been out every night this week.
    Every time I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.
    Ten pence is donated to charity for every bottle sold.
    These paintings may look like the real thing, but (each and) every one of them is a fake.
    That salmon was very expensive so make sure you eat up every (single) bit.

    every (REPEATED)
    determiner

    used to show that something is repeated regularly:
    Computers can perform millions of calculations every second.
    Every four minutes a car is stolen in this city.
    Every day in the United States 25 people are murdered with handguns.
    Every few kilometres we passed a burnt out jeep or truck at the side of the road.
    The conference takes place every other/second year.

    every (GREATEST)
    determiner

    the greatest possible or that can be imagined:
    I'd like to wish you every success in your new job/happiness in your new home.
    She has every reason to be unhappy after losing her job and her home.
    You had every opportunity to make a complaint.
    Every effort is being made to minimise civilian casualties.
    She has every right to be proud of her tremendous achievements.
     
  4. LadyBlakeney

    LadyBlakeney Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain
    Here's a good mnemonic rule:

    The Spanish phrase "Todos y cada uno de..." would be "Every and each one of..".

    The English phrase "Each and every one of..." would be "Cada uno y todos...".
     
  5. aaron New Member

    USA

    The word EVERY means ALL OF THE PERSONS OR THINGS, OR THE WHOLE GROUP OF PERSONS OR THINGS.

    For example, every bird has feathers, or every fish can swim.

    EACH means EVERY PERSON OR THING IN A GROUP, THOUGHT OF AS INDIVIDUAL PERSONS OR THINGS.

    You can say each hour I work, I earn 10 dollars. You can also say every hour I work, I earn 10 dollars.

    But there is a difference!

    For example, if you pay 2 workers 10 dollars for working one hour, it can mean that you pay 10 dollars for both of the workers together (EVERY worker). So you pay ten dollars for one hour of work to the two workers, and they have to share the 10 dollars (for example one worker gets 5 dollars, and the other worker gets 5 dollars, after working one hour).

    If you say EACH worker gets 10 dollars for working one hour, you are talking about individual workers. So if 2 people work for you one hour, and you pay them EACH 10 dollars, then one worker gets 10 dollars, AND the other worker also gets 10 dollars.


    I hope that helps!

    Aaron
     
  6. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Welcome to the forum, Aaron.

    I think I disagree with your explanation. To me, ten dollars to every worker is the same as ten dollars to each worker - unlike ten dollars to all the workers.

    (And if there are only two workers, we say "both workers" instead of "all the workers" and we don't usually say "every worker" either.)

    "Each" and "every" are synonymous I think, but there is a difference in emphasis. "Each" emphasizes taking them one by one; "every" emphasizes that not a one is excluded. "All" is also non-exclusive (like "every"), but "every" (unlike "all") refers to one at a time, like "each".

    Each bird has feathers. [Emphasis on the individual bird: look at a bird, you see that bird's feathers.]
    Every bird has feathers. [Emphasis on inclusiveness: no bird is without feathers.]

    Each bird has two wings. [Wings are allocated two per bird.]
    Every bird has two wings. [No bird is without two wings.]

    Each hour I work, I earn 10 dollars. [1 hour = 10 dollars.]
    Every hour I work, I earn 10 dollars. [Work an hour -> earn ten dollars; working an hour without earning ten dollars does not happen.]

    The employer gave each worker 10 dollars for each hour worked. [Very mathematical: Pick any one worker. That worker's pay is number of hours he or she worked times 10 dollars.]
    The employer gave every worker 10 dollars for each hour worked. [Same formula, but emphasizing that no worker is excepted]
    The employer gave each worker 10 dollars for every hour worked. [Pick any one worker. That worker's pay is 10 dollars times number of hours he or she worked, with no hour worked excepted.]
    The employer gave every worker 10 dollars for every hour worked. [Same formula. No worker is excepted, and no hour is excepted.]
     
  7. wizard8451 Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico, Spanish
    Yes. I agree.
     

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