1. tinabea17 New Member

    U.S. English
    Can you help me? What does the expression "echar ganas de" mean? The closest I get is, "to throw out the desire for". Thanks!
     
  2. supercrom Banned

    Cercado de Lima, Lima, Perú
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    Some context, pls...

    Without the context, it can be: "to do one's best".

    Hay que echarle ganas al trabajo, let's work together.
    We have to do our best for (to) the work, trabajemos juntos.

    I hope it helps.
     
  3. Marc1 Banned

    Italian / Spanish / German.
    THere is an ever increasing supply of jargon, slang and colloquialism. You can get a replay on formal terms whitout context but if you use expressions that are the product of localism, you better give it some context or it may be meaning the opposit.

    "Echar" is used as you would "Let loose" but it is used with all sort of context. Today a customer first insulted me during the course of an interview then said "Disculpe por echarle los chanchos"

    Echar ganas, I suppose is a further distortion of the expression "dar las ganas"
    No se me da la gana = No se me "echa" la gana.

    That is as far as I can guess.

    Please dont ask what does "uauaracha" mean or "cuchuflito" or "Miguelame churra la uaua que pica chiquita la cosita ugualita, la pepa palita." :D :D :D
     
  4. Edher

    Edher Senior Member

    USA
    Cd. de México, Spanish & English
    Saludos Tinabea17,

    The expression "echar ganas" means "to put a lot of effort in something."

    "Vamos a echarle muchas ganas a los estudios para graduarnos."

    "Let's put a lot of effort in our studies to graduate."

    Edher
     
  5. beatrizg Senior Member

    Colombia, Spanish
    In Colombia we don't use the expression "echar ganas". But it seems it's used in Peru and Mexico.
     
  6. supercrom Banned

    Cercado de Lima, Lima, Perú
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    En el Perú decimos "ponerle ganas", en todo caso, preferiríamos "echarle ganas a algo"

    It could (should) be "To make an effort to do something".
    Make a final effort to pass the exam.
    Ponle ganas (por última vez) para aprobar el examen.

    CROM
     
  7. David Senior Member

    Echarle algo is neither jargon, nor slang, nor colloquial. It is a pefectly standard expression.It is not in any way a distortion of darle las ganas. No me da la gana. It is a different expression, and perfectly standard, though less formal than words like aplicar or introducir. Ganas can be used in a sexual context, but so can urges or turn-on. But that doesn´t mean that "an urge to go to Europe," or "turn on the lamp" are jargon or colloquial.
     
  8. Marc1 Banned

    Italian / Spanish / German.
    Echar ganas = standard epression? Where, in the USA?
     
  9. ealmaza

    ealmaza Junior Member

    USA
    Spanish (México)
    Aun y cuando hace un año empezó este mensaje, me gustaria opinar en el tema, soy nueva en el foro y en verdad me ha ayudado mucho leer las aportaciones que todos hacen referente a un tema en específico.

    Estimado Marc1:
    Estoy en total acuerdo con David:

    Originally Posted by David
    Echarle algo is neither jargon, nor slang, nor colloquial. It is a pefectly standard expression.It is not in any way a distortion of darle las ganas. No me da la gana. It is a different expression, and perfectly standard, though less formal than words like aplicar or introducir. Ganas can be used in a sexual context, but so can urges or turn-on. But that doesn´t mean that "an urge to go to Europe," or "turn on the lamp" are jargon or colloquial.



    "Echarle ganas" es escuchado en México tanto en el norte, centro y sur del país y "darle ganas", es una expresión que he escuchado en los USA, quizas porceda de algun otro país latinoamericano (pero en el contexto te das cuenta que quieren decir lo mismo), pero es totalmente diferente a la expresión "No me da la gana".

    Cuando "Echarle ganas" es poner todo el esfuerzo, "No me da la gana" es que no lo haces porque no quieres.

    :0)
     
  10. Guardapalabra New Member

    Here's an extremely extemporaneous answer, posted in the hopes that someone researching this thread might find it helpful...

    I agree with David and ealmaza. "Echarle ganas a algo" is not jargon or slang. However, I believe it could be considered a colloquial expression (characteristic of informal spoken language or conversation). It is commonly used in Mexico, and used by people from all social groups regardless of formal education level. However, it is an expression which carries a low register.

    Some translations that come to mind, are:

    To give it your best
    To give it all you have
    To make an effort
    To put the best of you
    To do it with enthusiasm

    It is also vaguely connected to "dar ganas" or "tener ganas" in the sense that all these expressions include the word "gana" (desire, intention, willingness...), but in no way are they equal in meaning.

    Yes, Marc1, "echarle ganas" is a standard expression among millions and millions of Spanish speakers, both in Mexico and in the U.S.A, which are the linguistic locations I am more familiar with.
     
  11. LauritaMAR Senior Member

    Nueva York
    English
    Would it be: Vamos a echarleS muchas ganas a los estudios. ¿No se refiere "le(s)" a "los estudios"?
     

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