1. Philippa

    Philippa Senior Member

    Reading
    Britain - English
    ¡Hola otra vez!
    Lo siento, tengo otra preguntita....
    ¿Qué quiere decir 'echarle ganas en esta oración? (también se trata de la enseñanza):

    En esta profesión te puedes encontrar de todo, pero lo importante es echarle ganas.
    In this profession you come up against everything, but the important thing is to ?????? want to do it? throw yourself into it???

    Muchas gracias por vuestra ayuda, foreros y foreras
    Saludos
    Philippa :)
     
  2. Leopold

    Leopold Senior Member

    Barcelona
    es-ES
    Significa poner esfuerzo, hacer que a uno le guste algo.
    Es coloquial.

    Leo
     
  3. Neru Senior Member

    UK - Inglés
  4. Ranchuelo Junior Member

    Spain - Spanish
    Hola:

    "Echarle ganas" es coloquial. Se pueude traducir por: "being motivated".

    Saludos,

    Ranchuelo
     
  5. sendai

    sendai Senior Member

    Midwestern US
    USA/English
    Esta frase es un poco difícil de traducir. Tal vez uno de esos:

    to give it a good effort
    to jump into it with both feet
    to throw oneself into it
    to go at it with gusto
    to do it wholeheartedly
     
  6. Piano_boy_chile Senior Member

    Santiago de Chile
    Chile - Español
    Yeah, it could mean "throw yourself into it" but definitely the word 'effort' fits better in the phrase, like you could say "give it a big effort", as Sendai said. Or could the word "push" could be used, like "push hard for it" or something like that?. God, I loved this forum, I'm running the risk of making it my new bad vice. I could stay in it for hours. GreetingS and "push hard" for your goals!!!!!

    Pianoboy .-
     
  7. jandro_pardo Senior Member

    Galicia
    Galician & Spanish - Spain
    Hola a todos!! Creo que las opciones dadas en las anteriores intervenciones están bien, yo aporto una más, to feel like doing sth...
     
  8. Julie_UM

    Julie_UM Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    Y en el siguiente contexto, ¿cómo dirían en inglés lo subrayado?

    (niños ensayando una canción para un acto escolar)
    maestra: Sale bien, ¡pero canten con ganas!
     
  9. Julie_UM

    Julie_UM Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    I'd thought of "put more energy to it", but I don't think it's exactly the same.
     
  10. Julie_UM

    Julie_UM Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    How about "sing more energetically"? I know it's not the same, but...

    Sorry, guys, I still haven't found an answer to my question and I'm trying to guess here.... :(
     
  11. UKlinguist Junior Member

    Fuengirola
    Spain Englsh
    "make yourself want to"
     
  12. Julie_UM

    Julie_UM Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    So you'd say sth like "Come on, guys! Sing! Make yourself want to*!" ?

    *There seems to be sth missing there. :confused:
     
  13. loladamore

    loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    I like these. Also:

    To make an effort.
    To work at it.
    To give it all you've got.
    To put some effort into it.

    Saludos.
     
  14. Piano_boy_chile Senior Member

    Santiago de Chile
    Chile - Español
    I'd say...."It's going ok -- but please put some effort to it!"
     
  15. Julie_UM

    Julie_UM Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    Thanks Piano boy! :)
    And all others too!
     
  16. rpruiz Junior Member

    Quiero darle gracias a todos los foreros. Siempre que tengo dudas me asomo por aqui y encuentro excelentes sugerencias. En este thread me encantan las de sendai... para lo que yo estoy trabajando, me gusta "give it all you've got"!

    Gracias!
     
  17. marlu New Member

    USA
    English - USA
    Muchas gracias por contestarme pero todavia no veo como se puede usar "echarle ganas" en ingles con ninos chiquitos (de 3 a 4). A ninos pequenos como que no vas a decirles "try harder" o "give it all you've got", aunque si son buenas frases para adultos o adolescentes. :) Muchas gracias por toda su ayuda.
     
  18. loladamore

    loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    Hello marlu,

    You could perhaps try saying something like "Do your best" or "Do the best you can" with small children.
    I hope that helps.

    Saludos.
     
  19. marlu New Member

    USA
    English - USA
    Hola Loladamore,

    Muchas gracias por tu sugerencia. I will try using that phrase.
    I wouldn´t have thought of that. I think that would work for smaller
    children. Thanks! :)

    un saludo,
    Marlu
     
  20. Yankee_NLPer Senior Member

    NE Pennsylvania
    English-USA
    A teacher might say:
    That sounds better. Let's do it again and this time put your heart and soul into it!

    ...Iwant to hear you loud and clear!

    also, as an aside, the phrase loud and clear doesn't use the proper adverbial -ly endings... loudly and clearly. It comes from the US military, where a sargeant is berating a private:

    Did you hear me?
    Loud and clear, sir!
     

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