1. DocRussell

    DocRussell Senior Member

    Québec
    French-Canada
    Hi,
    I would like to know the meaning of "eeked out". Context :
    This woman who really eeked me out.

    I try : Cette femme qui m'exaspérait vraiment ???
     
  2. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Est-ce que c'est possible que c'était "freaked me out"?

    Oh, and a warm welcome to the Forum!
     
  3. pepperfire Senior Member

    Canada - English & French
    Non, eeked out = elle m'a choquée.
     
  4. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    D'accord. Je ne l'ai jamais entendu en Angleterre.
     
  5. pepperfire Senior Member

    Canada - English & French
    Il est colloque. J'ai 4 ados dans la maison.
     
  6. Wopsy

    Wopsy Senior Member

    The garden of Ireland
    English - Ireland
    Je ne l'ai jamais entendu en Irlande non plus - ça doit être lié au cri 'Eek!', poussé quand on voit une souris, par exemple ...
     
  7. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    eked out a living - gagnait une pittance, vivotait

    But in AE (elle m'a choqué ; elle m'a fait une drôle d'impression): This lady really freaked me out
     
  8. pepperfire Senior Member

    Canada - English & French
    No, wildan... She eeked me out... As I said in French, I have 4 adolescents in the house... it's how they're saying she creeped me out nowadays.
     
  9. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    The English language is an out of control cancer...

    Eke is in my dictionary, eek is not. Various trawls on Google get eek transposing to eke.

    It might help if we knew
    • Where does your eek come from?
    • What does "she creeped me out" mean?
    If we know this maybe we can find a translation...

    Have fun with google searches on eek (there are a lot of useless hits)

    GF..
     
  10. Wopsy

    Wopsy Senior Member

    The garden of Ireland
    English - Ireland
    See my post at number 6 above for a possible explanation:)
     
  11. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    Eek (mouse) is a what one says when one is surprised by a mouse

    Eek out or Eke out
    to make up for the deficiencies of : SUPPLEMENT Eked out his income by getting a second job.

    As to what the original sentence in this thread means ......

    GF..
     
  12. Wopsy

    Wopsy Senior Member

    The garden of Ireland
    English - Ireland
    Of course I understand the distinction between eek and eke.

    But, as Pepperfire has explained, adolescents are now taking the word eek and using it in a new way. For them 'to eek someone out' is to shock someone'.

    And I find this new usage quite inventive & amusing.
    'It SO doesn't eek me out' ;)
     
  13. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    OK, so eek out = creep out = foutre les boules à quelqu'un

    Je me coucherai moins bête ce soir...

    PS Is this a Canadian expression? Do English-speakers elsewhere know of this usage?
     
  14. Teafrog

    Teafrog Senior Member

    London
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Welcome to the forum, DocRussell :)

    It's obviously a contemporary Canadian youth lingo that you are hitting us with ;).
    I've always made the distinction between "to eke out" and "eek :eek:".
    Quite, it's called a proper context, hint hint ;). DocRussell, are you still around? :)
     
  15. bh7 Senior Member

    Limestone City
    Canada; English
    Actually, the interjection "eek" [= expressing surprise, mild alarm, etc.] is listed in the Canadian Oxford English Dictionary. So is "to eke out", of course. I'm unable to find any authority for an alleged variant spelling "eek out" with the meaning "to eke out" though.

    The backformation "to eek" (trans. v.), from the interjection, makes perfect sense and should be easily understandable, but it is argot or slang used by a particular social subgroup, not standard English.
     
  16. DocRussell

    DocRussell Senior Member

    Québec
    French-Canada
    Thanks a lot !!!

    I found the expression "eeked out" in a book written in 2005 by an author from Australia. The book is published in USA.

    It's great to have so much replies.
     
  17. AfWa New Member

    English- United States
    I know you may not need any more replies but...

    I believe the form of "eeked out" the author was using has nothing to do with scaring a person. In this part of the U.S. we use "eek out" as a synonym for "dig out" or "carve out." It CAN NOT be used on a direct object like "eek me out" THIS IS INCORRECT. Usually it is used in the specific context "to eek out a living" which is the same as "to barely make a living" or "to struggle to make a living" it implies great effort. I've also used it as "to eek out enough time;" or "to eek out a definition" from something that is convoluted or confusing.
     
  18. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    I've looked up "eek out" in my favourite source on urban slang, http://www.urbandictionary.com/, but without success. "Eek" is there in ten different shades of meaning, but nothing on "eek out".

    AfWa, you're spelling's haywire. Eke out, not eek.
     

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