1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

El que te hace llorar no merece tus lágrimas...

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Leyla, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. Leyla Senior Member

    Spanish-Argentina
    Hi dear all :)

    Necesito traducir lo siguiente de español a inglés, agradecería sus valiosas correciones.

    -El que te hace llorar no merece tus lágrimas, y el que las merezca jamás te hara llorar.

    My attempt:
    - Who makes you cry doesn´t deserve your tears and who does deserves them will never make you cry.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. honeypie Senior Member

    Around...
    English - USA
    Una manera formal (y literaria): He who makes you cry does not deserve your tears, and he who deserves them will never make you cry.

    Una manera menos formal: The one who makes you cry doesn't deserve your tears, and the one who does deserve them won't ever make you cry.
     
  3. mgwls Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Spanish (Argentina)
    Saludos
     
  4. Leyla Senior Member

    Spanish-Argentina
    Thanks a lot honeypie, mgwls
     
  5. honeypie Senior Member

    Around...
    English - USA
    En inglés "who" no puede ser el sujeto de la frase, tiene que ser "he who". Si quiere una opción muy coloquial puedes decir "The guy who".
     
  6. Alan Oldstudent

    Alan Oldstudent Junior Member

    United States, English (Standard American)
    Who says so?
    ;)
     
  7. honeypie Senior Member

    Around...
    English - USA
    Haha, I don't know if that's a strict rule or not, but it definitely doesn't sound right to say "Who makes you cry...".

    Although, if this were a question then it would perfect: "Who makes you cry?"
     
  8. Alan Oldstudent

    Alan Oldstudent Junior Member

    United States, English (Standard American)
    The word "who" can be an interrogative pronoun, as in "Who says so?" or "Who is it?" or even "Who the heck do you think you are?" (not aimed at you personally, of course...just an example). Note that here "who" is used in questions as it is an interrogative pronoun.

    The word "who" can can also be used to introduce a modifier, especially a relative modifier. This would be the case in this sentence:
    "He who makes you cry does not deserve your tears, and he who deserves your tears would never make you cry."

    In such a case, "he" traditionally has been used to mean either "he" or "she." "He" is the subject and the phrase "who makes you cry" is the modifier, introduced by "who."

    In the past 30 or 40 years, there has been a tendency to avoid using "he" in the sense of "he" or "she," likely as a reflection of the changing relationships and social roles of men and women. A way out of this dilemma is to say: "Those who make you cry don't deserve your tears, and those who deserve your tears would never make you cry."

    The reasons that Leyla's translation sound a little incorrect are that "who" is an interrogative pronoun used as the subject of a statement clause, and "jamás te hara llorar" really means something like "would never make you cry." However, "who" may be used as the subject of a question clause or question sentence

    Saludos,

    Alan
     
  9. valdo Senior Member

    Riga, Latvia
    Latvia, Latvian
    Que les parece - "The one who makes you cry isn't worth your tears. The one who is worth your tears would never make you cry."

    Saludos,
     
  10. cantueso Junior Member

    Madrid
    German
    In the past 30 or 40 years, there has been a tendency to avoid using "he" in the sense of "he" or "she," likely as a reflection of the changing relationships and social roles of men and women. A way out of this dilemma is to say: "Those who make you cry don't deserve your tears, and those who deserve your tears would never make you cry."

    The reasons that Leyla's translation sound a little incorrect are that "who" is an interrogative pronoun used as the subject of a statement clause, and "jamás te hara llorar" really means something like "would never make you cry." However, "who" may be used as the subject of a question clause or question sentence

    Saludos,

    Alan
    ______________

    "Those who" is good. I had thought of "If they make you..." but I realize that is changing it quite a bit.

    However, I think it is "the reason why" and not "the reason that". I realize that "the reason why" is absurd.
     
  11. Alan Oldstudent

    Alan Oldstudent Junior Member

    United States, English (Standard American)
    With all due respect, I think "the reason that" is preferable to "the reason why."

    Try this: Cut and paste the following line into the Google search engine, along with the quotation marks:
    "the reason that" "the reason why" "english usage"

    Saludos,

    Alan
     
  12. cantueso Junior Member

    Madrid
    German
    It might be preferable in many ways, but it is less idiomatic.

    I googled and got
    the reason that 1 980 000 hits

    the reason why 3 040 000 hits plus a nice book title: "The Reason Why: The Story of the Fatal Charge of the Light Brigade" (Cecil Woodham-Smith)







     

Share This Page