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En boca cerrada, no entran moscas.

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Monnik, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English
    En boca cerrada, no entran moscas

    ¿Alguien tiene idea de si hay un equivalente en inglés para este refrán?


    Saludos y gracias...
     
  2. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    Según lo que tengo entendido, su traducción es "A closed mouth gathers no flies", pero no tenemos un refrán equivalente.... A ver que dicen los demás...

    ¿Puedes explicarnos el significado del refrán español?
     
  3. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English
    Hola, Venus...

    Claro... significa, por ejemplo, que es mejor quedarse calladito que opinar cuando a uno no lo invitan a hacerlo... algo así como "you are better off just keeping quiet and minding your own business"

    Make sense?

    De todas formas, me gusta tu traducción. :) Muchas gracias!!
     
  4. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    WR nos proporciona el equivalente de: The less said, the better.
     
  5. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English
    Ah, suena bien... gracias de nuevo! :)
     
  6. vivek New Member

    Hyderabad
    India, Tamil/English/Hindi/Telugu
    A ver....Hay unas frases en ingles.

    "Silence is gold, speech is silver"

    "Empty vessels make more noise"

    ahora ya teno estos dos
    :)

    saludo,
    Vivek
     
  7. Ron in LA

    Ron in LA Senior Member

    Huntington Beach, California
    English - United States
    Poor paraphrase of expression attributed to Abraham Lincoln: "Better to remain silent and be considered a fool, then to speak up and prove that you are a fool."

    Wartime expressions: "Loose lips sink ships" and "Silence is the best security."
     
  8. Cecivit

    Cecivit Senior Member

    Necochea
    Argentina, Spanish


    Be careful!! vivek!! It's not the same meaning Monnik wants to convey.

    Empty vessels make most noise/sound: mucho ruido y pocas nueces.
    At least this is what I found in my English-Spanish Dictionary. I couldn't find the definition in English...Sorry!
    Hope it helps :)
    cecivit
     
  9. Cecivit

    Cecivit Senior Member

    Necochea
    Argentina, Spanish
    You're right Ampurdan. I had forgotten about that saying. I had never heard 'empty vessels make most noise', I found it in the Oxford Spanish-English Dictionary just by chance.
    Let's wait..and hope that somebody helps...:confused:
     
  10. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English

    Wow, thank you and gracias to all for participating here... I must make note of all of these examples (I especially loved yours, Ron). :)

    And, with regards to much ado about nothing, aquí en México - al menos en el caso de la película - lo tradujeron como Tanto para nada. No sé qué opinen.

    Más saludos...
     
  11. jinti

    jinti Senior Member

    How about "silence is golden"? Or, for a more modern version, "it is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt." :D
     
  12. Yashi

    Yashi Senior Member

    California
    USA, English
    If you don't have anything good to say, don't say it at all.

    Think before you speak.

    Better than a thousand sentences -- a mere jumble of meaningless words -- is one sensible phrase on hearing which one is pacified
     
  13. vivek New Member

    Hyderabad
    India, Tamil/English/Hindi/Telugu
    The Wren&Martin Grammar book(British) does have these Idioms.
     
  14. keyl Senior Member

    NJ, USA
    Argentina-Spanish / USA
    "Much ado about nothing" es "Mucho ruido y pocas nueces" Saluditos
     
  15. DanielBatchelar New Member

    English - US
    I was raised in California and had Spanish classes from fifth grade onward. My Spanish teacher, Senor Custodio, used to use this expression all the time, but in a slightly different form: Cerrada la boca, no entran las moscas. At least that's the way I remember it. He was usually talking to students who insisted on chattering away while he was trying to teach. Anyway, the translation to English is roughly: Keep your mouth closed and no flies will enter. The meaning is perfectly clear, but it sounds better in Spanish. : )
     
  16. Ríanse Senior Member

    Arizona
    English - California/AZ
    How about this one?

    "Loose lips sink ships."
     
  17. DanielBatchelar New Member

    English - US
    I believe that "Loose lips sink ships" originated in World War II. It literally means that mentioning shipping or naval craft times or routes -- say in a bar where your remarks might be overheard -- might cause those ships to be targeted by German submarines. The expression has survived as a warning not to give away secrets or you'll cause the enterprise to "sink." The way Senor Custodio used the Spanish expression, he was implying your babbling nonsense would only bring scorn and disrepute upon you. He wanted us to shut up and listen, so he was trying to shame us into silence. I guess you could view it as a caution not to run your mouth or you might be endangering the enterprise, whatever it might be, but I don't think that's the main intent.
     
  18. babalinda Junior Member

    Colorado
    English-USA
    How about-"let sleeping dogs lie"?
     
  19. crisco New Member

    English
    The best way to say that in English in my opinion, is "Silence is Golden". That is a common english phrase to tell someone that being quiet is a good thing.
     
  20. Marcus Valerius Martialis New Member

    Seattle, WA
    Bilingual English (England) Spanish (Spain)
    Keyl is right. "Much ado about nothing" is "Mucho ruido y pocas nueces". There's no literal equivalent to "En boca cerrada no entran moscas". "Loose lips sink ships" seems to have the same meaning: opening your mouth can bring disaster.
     
  21. keyl Senior Member

    NJ, USA
    Argentina-Spanish / USA
    "Loose lips sink ships" is the perfect equivalent. And i like the explanation abut its origins. "Silence is golden" is the same in Spanish "el silencio es oro" o "el silencio vale oro". It stresses the value of silence, while the other one is a warning against negative consequences the lack of discresion could bring upon the speaker or someone else.
     
  22. ampurdan

    ampurdan Modstachioed modnster

    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Català & español (Spain)
    "Loose lips sink ships" is indeed warning against lack of discretion.

    "En boca cerrada, no entran moscas" just says that you lose nothing by keeping quiet.

    As I see it, in some contexts they could mean the same, but not necessarily so in others.
     
  23. keyl Senior Member

    NJ, USA
    Argentina-Spanish / USA
    Mmm yes, I accept that's a possibility... Though I don't think that people in general would like to find flies in their mouths as a general rule... even if the consequence of opening one's mouth in Spanish seems less severe as it is in English... still for the proverb has for me the connotation of a warning. It's noit just about not loosing something but avoiding an unpleasant experience.


     
  24. jimmy jimmy New Member

    English
    The literal equivalent in English is "In a closed mouth, no flies will enter"
     
  25. Newport Dave New Member

    english
    "Il bocca chiusa, non c'entra mosca" is from an old Italian proverb and is probably the basis for the 'code of silence' instituted in the Mafia. It is basically a warning that you should keep that information you have to yourself or suffer the consequences such that you would be dead, with your mouth open and flies planting eggs,...the first place flies deposit for the decomposition of the body. I had heard several times that the Mexican Mafia was using this to warn that someone that was bragging about being connected would be dealt with. That was back in the late '50s and '60s when I heard this. It has become my favorite quote because it does convey that if you speak too much about the things you are involved with, it is no longer just your information. Something like: The only real secret is the one that only you know!
     
  26. keyl Senior Member

    NJ, USA
    Argentina-Spanish / USA
    "Il bocca chiusa, non c'entra mosca" is from an old Italian proverb and is probably the basis for the 'code of silence' instituted in the Mafia. It is basically a warning that you should keep that information you have to yourself or suffer the consequences such that you would be dead, with your mouth open and flies planting eggs,...the first place flies deposit for the decomposition of the body. I had heard several times that the Mexican Mafia was using this to warn that someone that was bragging about being connected would be dealt with.
    Really interesting, and it makes perfect sense.
     
  27. macame

    macame Senior Member

    Half a mile to heaven
    Spanish & Galician
    A shut mouth catches no flies.
     

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