1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

EN: both groups share X but (they) do not Y - repetition of the subject

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by benss, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. benss Senior Member

    Paris
    français
    Hi,

    I often face a problem and I've never asked someone what is the answer.
    The question I'm often asking myself is which of these two sentences would be correct:

    "they verb 1 ... and/but/then verb 2 ..."

    or

    "they verb 1 ... and/but/then they verb 2 ..."

    ?

    In other words, my question is:

    Is it obligatory or correct or wrong (??) to repeat the subject of two sentences separated
    by a preposition when the subject refers to the same person/object ?

    Example:

    " Indeed, both group mostly shares common characteristics but (they) do not display similar economic performances "

    Hope my request was clear enough.
    Thank you for your help.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  2. moustic Senior Member

    near Limoges
    British English
    " Indeed, both groups mostly share(s) common characteristics but (they) do not display similar economic performances "

    Both are correct, with or without the pronoun they.

    PS - both groups share ...
     
  3. benss Senior Member

    Paris
    français
    Thank you.
    Lastly, sorry to be insistent, would you give predilection to one of both ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  4. moustic Senior Member

    near Limoges
    British English
    Just a question of personal preference. Both seem fine to me.
     
  5. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    Actually, I'm not a big fan of this sentence, and I don't quite agree that the choice to include or omit "they" is bonnet blanc ou blanc bonnet.

    We wouldn't write "Both groups don't display similar economic performance" as a stand-alone sentence. The word "both" is properly the subject of a positive sentence. In a negative, as here, we would replace it with something like "the (two) groups don't share..." Alternately, we would recast in the positive: "both/the groups display different economic performance."

    Since the first half of your full sentence starts with "both" and is already in the positive, putting the second half in the negative with a shared subject is awkward. Minor changes yield a better-written sentence with parallel structure. There are many options. To help you see the parallel structure in the following sentences, subjects are marked in blue and verbs in green.

    • Both groups share common characteristics but display different economic performance.
      Both [share X] but [display Y].
    • Although both groups share common characteristics, they don't share economic performance (results).
      Although both [share X], they [don't share Y]
    • Although both groups share common characteristics, their economic performance differs.
      Although [both share X], [Y differs].
    • The two groups share common characteristics but not economic peformance statistics.
      They share [X] but not [Y].
    • The two groups share common characteristics, but their economic performance differs.
      [They share X], but [Y differs].

    If you insist on retaining "both groups share... but do not...", then I would strongly encourage you to use "they," thus completing the second clause with a more appropriate subject than "both," creating two complete sentences, and joining them -- correctly -- with a comma and a conjunction:

    • Both groups share common characteristics, but they do not display similar economic performance.
      [Both share X], but [they don't display Y].
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  6. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I think the sentence is best without they, but if you want to include it, put a comma before but.

    I do not see a problem with using a negative in the last part of a compound predicate because it does not make the whole predicate negative.
     
  7. benss Senior Member

    Paris
    français
    Thank you very much for your inputs.
    Special thanks to fann for his/her detailed answer. I got your message now.
     

Share This Page