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EN: he has done it again / he did it again

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by sclubusher, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. sclubusher

    sclubusher Senior Member

    French
    Bonjour,

    voila je vous explique :

    pas plus tard que cematin j'ai vu une phrase :

    "He's done it again"

    Et je me suis dis pourquoi c'est pas "He did it again" ?

    donc j'aimerais que vous me donniez 1 phrase dans lequel il y a
    "done it again" et "did it again" pour que je vois bien la difference entre les deux, car c'est un peu le flou je dois dire...


    Merci pour vos réponses
     
  2. Razin' Junior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Tunisian
    Il me semble que les Américains utilisent plus souvent le present perfect là où un Britannique utiliserait le simple past, notamment pour des actions ponctuelles qui ne se prolongent pas forcément dans le présent.
    Cependant, je pense qu'un native pourrait t'expliquer ça beaucoup mieux que moi.
     
  3. b1947420 Senior Member

    Unfortunately my English grammar knowledge is less good than my French grammar knowledge :eek:

    I suspect (maybe a grammar expert will confirm) that the differences are similar to that of the French parfait and imparfait.
    If this explanation does not help you enough then let me know and I will try to expand further.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2009
  4. AhhXD717 New Member

    Indiana
    English - US
    For me, the expression "He's done it again" is just something that people say; like a set expression.

    But as for the difference between the present perfect and the simple past, I think I might be able to explain.

    In the sentence "That's the best movie I've seen", I feel like there's more of a feeling that it's something up to now. It's hard to explain. Or like... "I've been standing here for a while". It's something that's been going on in the past until now. If i say, "I've eaten so much." There's more of a sense that the action has ended at the current moment or still going on. I could say "I ate so much", but I could be talking about something that occurred a week beforehand. Like I could say "I ate so much at that party a week ago" but i couldn't say "I've eaten so much at that party a week ago". The simple past has a definite start and end in the past while the present perfect can express an action that started in the past but is still going on or just ended in the present.
    That's my horrible attempt at an explanation. Haha
     
  5. Glat64 Senior Member

    Vendée, France
    English
    My Grammar’s not good either, but for any French speakers that come across this, all I can say is from what I've seen there is not so much importance in English between the use of parfait and imparfait in a lot of cases. In this case in particular you can use both for pretty much any situation.

    Guess what ?
    What ?
    He's done it again/He did it again.
    Did what again ?
    Crashed the car ! / Fallen down the stairs ! / Won the lottery !

    He did it again ! / He's done it again !
    What ?
    Crashed the car ! / Fallen down the stairs ! / Won the lottery !

    Hope this helps someone !
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Je dirais que c'est plutôt le contraire. Au moment de voir quelqu'un faire quelque chose de mauvais pour la n-ième fois, je dirais (en bon britannique) "You've done it again!", pas "You did it again!"
     
  7. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    :thumbsup:
     

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