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EN: hope + future / present / infinitive

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by quentin75, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. quentin75 Senior Member

    paris
    france
    Bonjour peut-on utiliser en anglais le futur et le présent après" I hope"

    ex= I hope I will visit Spain next year
    I hope I visit Spain next year
    ??

    Note des modérateurs : nous avons fusionné plusieurs discussions pour créer ce fil.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2013
  2. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    I hope I visit Spain next year :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2013
  3. quentin75 Senior Member

    paris
    france
    donc je dosi en conculre qu'on utilise pas le futur avec "i hope"???
     
  4. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    It doesn't sound natural to me, to be honest. It might be grammatically correct, but that is a question for the grammar forum. I personally would not use the future here.

    In fact I would probably say:

    I hope to visit Spain next year.

    That would depend on context, though.
     
  5. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Bonsoir quentin! On peut utiliser tous les deux, bienque "I hope to visit Spain next year" soit le mieux.
     
  6. catay Senior Member

    Canada anglais
    :)Je suis d'accord.
     
  7. quentin75 Senior Member

    paris
    france
    Bonjour
    doit-on dire " I hope you will come next week" ou "I hope you come next week"?

    Le futur est-il jamais possible après le verbe " hope"?
     
  8. icecreamsoldier

    icecreamsoldier Senior Member

    New Zealand English
    Mais si, si par exemple le COD étant 'you' :
    I hope you'll visit Spain next year!
    = I hope you will decide to go to Spain next year
     
  9. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Yes, I would definitely use the future in that scenario.
     
  10. Avignonais Senior Member

    USA
    USA, Anglophone
    I will come n'est pas vraiment le futur bien que l'expression soit souvent utilisée pour exprimer l'idée du futur. Cela veut dire: j'ai l'intention de venir.

    J'espère que tu va avoir l'intention de venir est un des sens de la phrase I hope you will come. Et pour cette raison, ces trois sont préférables:
    I hope that you come
    I hope that you will be able to come (que tu pourras venir)
    I hope that can come (que tu pourras venir)
     
  11. floise Senior Member

    Quebec
    U.S.;English
    Avignonais,

    Maybe it is technically true that 'you will come' has the real meaning of 'you intend to come', but MOST people use 'will' without the meaning of intention. They use it with the neutral meaning of future action.

    I see nothing wrong with translating 'J'espère que tu viendras la semaine prochaine' as 'I hope you'll come next week' OR 'I hope you come next week'. I believe that most native English speakers would not distinguish between the two.


    Floise
     
  12. Avignonais Senior Member

    USA
    USA, Anglophone
    OK, so I have heard that version used: "I hope that you'll come next week". But for some reason it always sounds like the person is shortening "I hope that you'll (be able to) come". Maybe it's just me.

    I still maintain that personally I prefer the three versions that I mentioned, but I concede that Floise is right: I hope that you'll come next week is possible and used.
     
  13. spootnikk Senior Member

    France (French)
    Hi,

    I think that we could use 'be going to' instead of 'will' in order to underline the intention: For instance, "I am going to have an early night" is "stronger" than "I will have an early night", isn't it?
     
  14. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    There are some quite subtle differences here. I think you are right that "going to" is slightly stronger then "will" in the original example (it's a bit like an emphasised "will" in speech). "I hope you come next week" (one of the original examples) has the same effect, perhaps because the natural rhythm of that sentence lands the main emphasis on "come" - or maybe it's a grammatical thing I don't recognise.

    In your own examples, the distinction doesn't quite work. It's hard for my anglophone ear to imagine anyone saying "I will have an early night" unless it's about a time well in the future - "I won't come to the theatre next Tuesday as I will have an early night." For something comparable with "I'm going to have an early night (tonight)" we'd normally say "I'll have an early night" or "I think I will have an early night". There's something odd about the word "will" in this context even though technically its use wouldn't change the sense; it just sounds too decisive - hence the shortening and the use of tentative verb in my two examples.
     
  15. spootnikk Senior Member

    France (French)
    Thanks for your detailed explanations clairet. :)
    It seems that I have been clumpsy when it has come to choose a relevant example!
     
  16. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    It's only a very subtle question of usage - and probably the next anglophone along would disagree with me!
     
  17. pmin Senior Member

    French
    Voilà le contexte: Un jeune parle de sa future carrière et de ses souhaits:
    dirait-il plutôt:
    I hope to earn a lot of money.
    I hope I will earn a lot of money.

    En français je ne vois pas vraiment de différence:
    J'espère gagner beaucoup d'argent / J'espère que je gagnerai beaucoup d'argent

    Thanks
     
  18. moustic Senior Member

    near Limoges
    British English
    There isn't much difference in English either.
     
  19. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    agreed - in fact, I don't see any difference of meaning at all unless there is a strong spoken emphasis on "will" in the second example, which indicates that the speaker thinks it may not happen but hopes it will.
     
  20. SgtBullmoose Junior Member

    Berlin
    English - Canadian and UK
    I hope + infinitive generally means that you are working towards a goal.
    I hope + I will = a general wish for myself.
    I hope + (subject other than I) = a general wish for someone else.
     

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