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EN: One has to be strong and face his/her/their/one's fears

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by Ellyn, Oct 28, 2010.

  1. Ellyn Junior Member

    France, French
    Hi everyone,

    I was wondering what article could refer to "one".

    For instance:
    One has to be strong and face his/hers/their/one's fears.


    I think I have already seen "one's" used in a book , but I am not sure. I am pretty sure his or her is incorrect, but I wonder about the use of "their".

    Thank you for your help,

    Ellyn
     
  2. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    Because you have started the sentence with 'one', you should continue with 'one's':
    -One has to be strong and face one's fears.
    This is very formal, and would not generally be used in ordinary conversation, but it is the correct level of language if you are writing an essay.

    Similarly, if you decided to begin with 'you', you would continue with 'your':
    - You have to be strong and face your fears.
    This is the more usual spoken form.

    'Their' could be used if your subject was more general (and plural). A singular subject would use 'its':
    -People have to be strong and face their fears.
    -Society has to be strong and face its fears.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2010
  3. amg8989 Senior Member

    USA
    English-United Sates
    kind of equivalent to:

    il faut dire...
    il faut savoir
    ....
    etc ??

    n'est-ce pas?
     
  4. Ellyn Junior Member

    France, French
    Oui, c'était bien de ce "il" indéfini ou "on" indéfini que je parlais. =)
     
  5. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    Alsace, France
    French - France, ♀
    One has to be strong and face his/hers/their/one's fears. : le pronom possessif hers ne va pas avant fears ; il faut employer l'adjectif possessif her fears.

    Et pour plus de précisions sur l'emploi du they au singulier "neutre" ou"indéterminé" (d'où their et theirs), voir ici.
     

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