1. djivana Junior Member

    Serbian, Serbia and Montenegro
    Hello!Could anyone help me with the phrase "en pie de guerra?Thank you!
     
  2. gisele73

    gisele73 Senior Member

    Norway
    Spanish - Peru
    I think it's something like "about to start a war".

    But better wait for other suggestions :)
     
  3. djivana Junior Member

    Serbian, Serbia and Montenegro
    thanks Gisele73! I tought it was something like that, but I found that it could mean to mobilize, so I'm not sure exactly.
     
  4. Summer_rose Senior Member

    Barcelona, España
    Español/España

    From Wordreference:

    guerra f war:
    en pie de guerra, on the warpath

    Regards.
     
  5. dinis Senior Member

    usa english
    Dear Djivana,
    My Larousse translates the term as ON A WAR FOOTING which is used especially for national governments set on war. For a religious or consumer group set on a moral campaign, you may prefer to use GIRDED FOR BATTLE although the phrase is almost poetic in its connotations. ON THE WARPATH is still very redolent of the Indian uprisings of the nineteenth century and tends to have negative nuances. Some men claim their wives go on the war path on a monthly cycle! In colloquial English, we could also say READY FOR A FIGHT even for an entire populace riled up about some injustice (real or perceived).
    I hope this helps.
    Yours,
     
  6. cereza

    cereza Senior Member

    Spanish
    Hola,
    en pie de guerra, es cuando luchas en primera línea, dando la cara
     
  7. dinis Senior Member

    usa english
    Among the 3 definitions given by RAE for EN PIE DE GUERRA, one finds this one:
    Dicho de una plaza, de una comarca o de una nacion que se arma y pertrecha de todo lo necesario para combatir.
    ( to be continued)
     
  8. dinis Senior Member

    usa english
    The last RAE definition for EN PIE DE GUERRA reads as follows:
    Preparado para una accion intenso.
    I believe my suggestions for translation into English cover the bases of the above definition and the one given in my previous post.
    There is,however multiple tranlations for the expression in question. It all depends, as always, on context .
    Yours,
     
  9. dinis Senior Member

    usa english
    Excuse the the fast typing, I meant to copy the word "intensA", of course.
     
  10. diegodbs

    diegodbs Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain-Spanish
    La última definición de la RAE es, quizás, la más usada en español. Es una expresión coloquial.

    - Los sindicatos, en pie de guerra ante los anunciados recortes salariales.
    - El sector de la construcción, en pie de guerra en defensa de.....
     
  11. fsabroso

    fsabroso Moderadiólogo

    South Texas
    Perú / Castellano
    Hi,

    I would say "ready to fight"
     
  12. Terry Mount Senior Member

    U S A
    De acuerdo "ready to fight" "prepared to fight" "ready to do battle"
     
  13. dinis Senior Member

    usa english
    I think that in written English we often tend towards the combination of an adjectival or verbal phrase to capture the inchoative aspects of the expression in question ( e.g. SET TO, DETERMINED, HEADING FOR)followed by a verb which conveys an idea of conflict.
    Examples:

    THE UNIONS ARE HEADING FOR A CLASH WITH MANAGEMENT OVER THE RECENTLY ANNOUNCED WAGE CUTS.

    TOP CONSTRUTION COMPANIES ARE SET TO WAGE A CAMPAIGN IN FAVOR OF THE NEW SUBURBAN EXPANSION BILL.

    THE US BISHOPS' CONFERENCE HAS RESOLVED TO JOIN THE FRAY IN THE ICEL'S PROPOSED RESISTENCE TO THE VATICAN'S NEW NORMS FOR LITURGICAL TRANSLATIONS. Y asi por el estilo (ad nauseam).
    Yours,
     

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