enrolled in or at

Discussion in 'English Only' started by comeondai, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. comeondai Junior Member

    Italy
    Mauritius, french, english, italian
    Hi,
    i'm working on a translation and I have a doubt about this: Which one is the right way? Someone is enrolled AT a university or IN a university?
    Thanks.
     
  2. temujin

    temujin Senior Member

    Hamburg - Germany
    Norway / norwegian
    You could use "imatriculated"... "imatricalated at the Univeristy of XX"

    ...as to your original question I´µ not sure either...

    t.
     
  3. Dempsey

    Dempsey Junior Member

    Australia
    English, Australia
    "I enrolled at university" sounds better to me. I suppose because you're talking about a location. You enrolled at a certain place.

    If you were talking about enrolling in several places I think "in" would be more appropriate. Ie: "I have enrolled in several universities over the years".

    That's just my preference though. Wait for other opinions.
     
  4. comeondai Junior Member

    Italy
    Mauritius, french, english, italian
    The problem is I have to use both enroll and matriculate in the same sentence...Thanks for helping anyway!
     
  5. temujin

    temujin Senior Member

    Hamburg - Germany
    Norway / norwegian
    Why don´t you post the complete sentence?

    t.
     
  6. comeondai Junior Member

    Italy
    Mauritius, french, english, italian
    Dempsey.... mmm... what's the difference between the first and second options? Be it one or many, they are locations as you said, so this means that I should use at for both, if I follow your rule.....
     
  7. comeondai Junior Member

    Italy
    Mauritius, french, english, italian
    Yes, maybe that would make things easier Tem! here it is:

    THE OFFICIAL RECORDS HAVING BEEN EXAMINED, ON REQUEST OF THE PARTY CONCERNED,
    IT IS CERTIFIED THAT
    Ms. XXX, born YYY in ZZZ, of ITALIAN nationality, admitted (or matriculated??) in the FIRST YEAR of the second level degree course in COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS FOR INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS in PERUGIA (60/S - Class of Specialization Degrees in International Relations di cui al D.M 28/11/ 2000) in the Academic year 2006/2007, at – UNIVERSITA’ PER STRANIERI – PERUGIA on the 04/10/2006, is enrolled in this University, for the Academic Year 2006/2007, in the FIRST YEAR of the FACULTY OF ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE in the second level degree course in SPECIALIZATION DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS FOR INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (60/S - Class of Specialization Degrees in International Relations di cui al D.M 28/11/ 2000) in PERUGIA.


    Geez... I know it's quite scary with all the capital letters, but that's the format.......
     
  8. victoria1 Senior Member

    Mauritius - English & French
    "is admitted in the first year": est admise en première année
    "is enrolled at university": est inscrite à l'Université
     
  9. Dempsey

    Dempsey Junior Member

    Australia
    English, Australia

    Yes, that seems fair. I can only tell you which sounds better to my ears, my personal preference. As far as I can tell, they are both greatly interchangeable.
     
  10. temujin

    temujin Senior Member

    Hamburg - Germany
    Norway / norwegian
    :eek:

    I think I would use "enrolled in/ admitted for" in the first case.
    "Enrolled at this University" sounds better in the second case.

    t.
     
  11. comeondai Junior Member

    Italy
    Mauritius, french, english, italian
    Ok, still doing this certificate translation.... See the text above, the one with all the capitals letters.... does anybody have a clue on how I should translate the underlined words??? the sense is as follows: I know it's a bit complicated... what they mean is that she got "registered" in their records due to the course XXX, in which she is enrolled now.... Hmmm..doesn't sound clear, innit..? The fact is that she could have been registered in their records in 2005 due to a course YYY, and then changed and enrolled in the XXX course.... Aarghhh....
    [​IMG]
     

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