1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Entre tú y yo / Entre ti y mí

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Kscnoko, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. Kscnoko New Member

    China Chinese
    Which of them is correct?
     
  2. LatinRainbow Senior Member

    español
    Hola,
    Entre tú y yo.
    That's the correct one.
     
  3. Fedman3 Senior Member

    Los Angeles, California
    Spanish - Mexico
    "Entre tú y yo" is the correct option

    If what you are trying to say is the expression "between you and I" (like when you are trying to share a secret or something confidential), you could also say...

    "Entre nos". Or, "Aquí entre nos".

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    Sorry, I couldn't help myself. It's a pet peeve of mine.
     
  5. Fedman3 Senior Member

    Los Angeles, California
    Spanish - Mexico
    Dear FromPa,

    Sorry, but you're mistaken. Yes, the expression is commonly used as "you and me", but it is grammatically incorrect. It should be "you and I". This is a rule that should apply... to you and me. :)

    Check it out...

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=547875

    Best regards, :)
     
  6. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    When used as a subject, the proper pronoun is "I"; when used as an object, it's "me". In the phrase "between you and me," "me" is the object of the preposition "between."
     
  7. canton Senior Member

    Colombian Spanish
    Yes, FromPA is right: "entre tú y yo" = "between you and me" (both you and me are object pronouns in this case, just like "between us", not "between we").
    The Spanish seems irregular in this case, because the normal pronouns after a prepostion would be ti and : para ti y para mí. I think the phenomenon occurs because "entre" is operating for both objects, a rare occurrence in Spanish (we'd say, for example: sin ti y sin mí, NOT sin ti y mí, whereas English says without you and me).
     
  8. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Does anybody know if "entre" is the only preposition in Spanish which is followed by subject pronouns?
     
  9. Pinairun

    Pinairun Senior Member

    Creo que versus ha sido incluida en la lista de preposiciones en español: Tú versus yo.
    Aunque sería preferible decir "tú contra mí"
     
  10. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Thanks, Pinairun. I would have never thought of that one!
    I seem to remember having read a thread (which I can't find now) in which it was said that versus had a different meaning in Spanish from its English counterpart.
     
  11. loudspeaker Senior Member

    Madrid
    British English
  12. James2000 Senior Member

    English - South Africa
    I believe 'según' is another commonly quoted example.

    Agreed. Merriam Webster's dictionary has a video on this particular issue, which can be found with an appropriate Google search.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  13. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Thanks, loudspeaker. That it not the thread I was referring to - yours is much better and more informative!
    And thanks also to James - I'd forgotten about "según yo", even though I use it :).
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  14. melissinda Senior Member

    Philadelphia, Pa
    USA, english
    Entonces, Para aclarar, nunca se usa el pronombre preposicional con "entre".

    El libro está entre tú y yo
    En vez
    El libro está entre mi y ti
     
  15. Pinairun

    Pinairun Senior Member

    This is a new item; no more italics.

    Artículo nuevo.Avance de la vigésima tercera edición
    versus.
    (Del ingl. versus, y este del lat. versus 'hacia').
    1. prep. Frente a, contra. Occidente versus Oriente.

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     
  16. Pinairun

    Pinairun Senior Member

     
  17. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    There is a very weird contruction that allows 'para yo', in 'Quiero esa bicicleta para yo andar' (o 'ese juguete para yo jugar'). I think I've read once it comes from Portuguese (and reached our lovely 'Portuñol')
     
  18. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Thanks for the extra information, Pinairun.
     

Share This Page