Er will zwei Diktaturen erlebt haben

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by gaer, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Edit: split from here.

    "Es war wie jene Mea-Culpa-Ergüsse, die Politiker und Künstler der DDR in den Neunziger Jahren formelhaft zu absolvieren hatten, bis hinauf zu Heiner Müller, der plötzlich zwei Diktaturen erlebt haben wollte."

    I don't understand this sentence. What is it saying? I don't understand the underlined part at all. :(

    Gaer
     
  2. jester.

    jester. Senior Member

    Aachen, Germany
    Germany -> German
    It says: ..., who suddenly claimed to have experienced two dictatorships.

    Edit: etwas erlebt haben wollen = von sich behaupten etwas getan zu haben
     
  3. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Gary,

    hoffentlich helfen dir mehr Beispiele dazu. Man benutzt "wollen ... gemacht haben"/"wollen... machen", um sich von einer Aussage zu distanzieren, um seinem Misstrauen oder Skepsis einen Ausdruck zu verleihen.

    Zum Beispiel ein Rechtsanwalt kann vor dem Gericht die Aussage eines Zeugen in Frage stellen:
    Erst sagen Sie, Sie haben den Täter nur von hinten erblickt, und jetzt wollen sie wissen, dass er eine Narbe auf der Stirn hatte?
    Erst sagen Sie, Sie haben den Täter nur von hinten erblickt, und jetzt wollen Sie eine Narbe auf seiner Stirn gesehen haben?

    Jana
     
  4. I.C. Senior Member

    D
    I would guess the author wants to imply that Heiner Müller, because of his communistic convictions and involvement with the regime, would not have experienced the GDR as a dictatorship.
    Which would be a silly statement, by the way.

    P.S.: And because of his privileged status, which made life more comfortable for him.
     
  5. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    That's a big help. I have other problems with this setence, but let me think about it a bit. I think I'm missing some really key political information. :(

    Gaer
     
  6. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Jana, that's excellent help. I'm quite tired at the moment, but I'll return to the sentence later. I THINK it's lack of context that is throwing me off, but I'm not sure yet. :)

    Gaer
     
  7. I.C. Senior Member

    D
    Thought of another potential meaning of this sentence and I sense this could have been the intended one. The author, who in this case would probably belong to the radical left, might mean to criticise the political climate and the course of events following the fall of the Soviet Union.

    The sinister forces of capitalism have won. Conformity pressure forces East German politicians and artists to humiliate and cleanse themselves by means of public self-criticism of their former convictions. It was so bad that even Heiner Müller felt the need to do it and so he declared to have lived through two dictatorships. Had he been true to his old ideals, he should only have labelled the Third Reich as a dictatorship.

    This would be quite an original thought, so no wonder my feeble mind didn’t think of it immediately, as

    - the “Democratic Socialism” of the GDR by definition of its own official ideology had been a “dictatorship of the proletariat”,
    - unless I am mistaken Heiner Müller himself justified the necessity of such a dictatorship in his plays,
    - in the GDR the performance of some of his plays was obstructed by authorities. I think his play “Mauser” was forbidden.

    The last line of "Mauser" is “Tod den Feinden der Revolution!”, the last sentence of Müller’s comment is “Die Stadt Witebsk steht für alle Orte, an denen eine Revolution gezwungen war ist sein wird, ihre Feinde zu töten”.
     
  8. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I think you are probably "spot on". I just got information from someone else regarding Heiner Müller, a person who was totally unknown to me. I believe we now know what the sentence means! :)

    Gaer
     

Share This Page