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Es "el pez que se muerde la cola"

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by May2, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. May2 Senior Member

    Spanish
    ¿Hay alguna frase hecha en inglés para esta frase española?

    Gracias/Thanks!
     
  2. turi Senior Member

    En un lugar de Catalunya
    Catalán y castellano.
    Creo que "bite your/his/her/etc. own tail".

    Pero espera más sugerencias.

    Saludos, t.
     
  3. Traduita Senior Member

    Greece, Greek
    Puede ser también un "vicious circle". El diccionario me da tb. "chicken and egg situation" o "no win situation".
    A lo mejor hay alguna frase hecha, espera más opiniones.
     
  4. jj3118 Senior Member

    New York-Philadelphia
    English y Español (Costa Rica)
    Concuerdo con turissa.
     
  5. alacant

    alacant Senior Member

    Alicante, Spain
    England, english
    All the suggestions are applicable, but I like vicious circle the best.

    Cheers, ala
     
  6. May2 Senior Member

    Spanish
    yes "vicious circle" sounds very good to me.

    Many thanks to you all!
     
  7. UUBiker Senior Member

    Arlington, Virignia
    United States, English
    being hoist[ed] on one's own petard, perhaps, to quote Shakespeare?
     
  8. smirkytoy Junior Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    English & Greek
    La traducción debe ser: catch 22.
     
  9. seedeer New Member

    English
    Yo prefiero la version de 'smirkytoy' - catch 22.
    'no win situation' is also ok.
     
  10. SydLexia Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    This actually means something different. 'Blown up by one's own bomb', in actual (original) fact.

    syd
     
  11. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Perhaps "Like a dog chasing its (own) tail."?

    How is "el pez que se muerde la cola" actually used?
     
  12. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    "to cut off one's nose to spite one's face"? (fixed phrase in English)

    E.g.
    "He is a nasty man, he would cut off his nose to spite his face"
     
  13. alacant

    alacant Senior Member

    Alicante, Spain
    England, english
    No, that's not it.

    Saludos, ala
     
  14. May2 Senior Member

    Spanish
    Un pez que se muerde la cola means that you have no solution for this, or that if there is any it doesn’t solve the situation as it makes it difficult in another way.

    It’s such an old threat that I do not remember the context but "Vicious circle" seemed good to me that time.

    Sorry for the charachters, I'm not able to make them smaller...

    .
     
  15. romarsan

    romarsan Senior Member

    Valencia
    SPAIN - SPANISH
    Lo interpreto como Alacant. Se usa para expresar que, siguiendo los mismos pasos una y otra vez, se van a obtener los mismos resultados, no vas a salir del mismo circulo. La pescadilla que se muerde la cola toma la forma de un circulo cerrado.

    Un ejemplo:

    El servicio público de transporte es la pescadilla que se muerde la cola: la gente casi no lo usa y por eso es caro y, como es caro, casi nadie lo usa.

    Saludos
     
  16. alacant

    alacant Senior Member

    Alicante, Spain
    England, english
    Exactly, perfect example, thank you.

    Saludos, ala
     
  17. BENITO CERENO Junior Member

    SPANISH
    No, spodulike, the sense of the sentence He is a nasty man, he would cut off his nose to spite his face" , has nothing to do with el pez que se muerde la cola .
    The Spanish expression refers more to an idea which has no solution, or is so common-place that is always the same whatever you do to manage it. I don't find an expression in Spanish for the one you wrote at the moment, but it is closer to ser más bruto que un arado , o algo así como mirarse el propio ombligo.
     
  18. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    The concept is "a vicious circle", as noted in post #3 by Traduita and promptly endorsed by alacant and May2.
     
  19. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    I agree. By the way you may sometimes also hear "vicious cycle" which means exactly the same thing and is simply an alternative of the original "a vicious circle". In my opinion the former is merely a corruption of the latter and so is incorrect but it has become quite common recently. (In England at any rate)
     

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