Even though it was past the deadline, they let me add your name to my application.

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Rainysky, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. Rainysky Junior Member

    English-USA
    Hi,

    I need to write a thank-you note to someone who let me use their name as a reference. How do I say:

    Even though it was past the deadline, they let me add your name to my application.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    I'd say 'anche se era scaduto il termine, mi hanno fatto aggiungere il vostro(?) nome (as reference?) alla domanda'.
    But I don't know, it's not so clear. It doesn't seems a thank you note to me... And is it 'their', not 'his/her'? I think that some more context would be useful.
     
  3. Rainysky Junior Member

    English-USA
    Sorry if it was unclear. I'm going to start the note with, "Dear XXX, Thank you for allowing me to use your name as a reference. I called the XXX Foundation office last week. Even though it was past the deadline, they (or she, the receptionist) let me add your name as a reference to my application.
     
  4. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Ah, okay. Then 'anche se i termini erano scaduti, mi hanno permesso di aggiungere il suo/tuo nome alla domanda come referenza'.
    Anyway my doubt was about 'their name' in your explanation, not about 'they let me' in the sentence... ;):)
     
  5. Leo57 Senior Member

    Yorkshire
    UK English
    Hi there Necsus
    We do use "their" in this manner when it is not specific who it is. The clue is "someone". e.g.

    Has everyone gone home?
    Yes (they have)
    Oh, someone has left their briefcase in the cloakroom.

    Has Cathy gone home?
    Yes she has.
    Oh, she has left her briefcase behind.

    I hope this is what you meant! If not, not to worry as it might have at least helped someone else with their learning. ;)

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     
  6. Rainysky Junior Member

    English-USA
    thank you so much for your responses! :)
     
  7. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Ah, okay. Thanks, Leo! So we can say that in some way it is the plural of 's/he'...! :)
     
  8. Leo57 Senior Member

    Yorkshire
    UK English
    Well, not exactly, it is the plural of his/her(s) and it means we don't need to say........someone left his/her briefcase behind. I know you get this,;) but just to be clear, in this case the someone is only one person.

    John has left his wallet at home.
    Cathy has left her purse at home.
    John and Cathy have left their briefcases at work.
    Someone has left their umbrella on the bus. (One person and one umbrella, but we use their.)

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     
  9. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Giusto, è il possessivo... Grazie, Leo!
     

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