Exit line

Discussion in 'English Only' started by kakum, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. kakum Junior Member

    Japanese
    It'a conversation between two actors at backstage.

    -Well, can you think of an exit line?
    -Sure.

    Please tell me the meaning of "exit line ".
     
  2. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    I imagine they are discussing how to end the scene or the act, I mean what to say at the end... I may be wrong though. :)
     
  3. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    An exit line is what an actor says when leaving the stage. Since actors often come and go during a scene, it is often not said at the end of a scene.
     
  4. kakum Junior Member

    Japanese
    Thank you boozer and Egmont.
     
  5. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    It literally means this, for sure, but it is often used in broader contexts too.

    Without more context we cannot be sure what these two mean here. It looks to me as though they could be talking about something else (actors do not write their own lines for a play). They are probably using the familiar terms of their profession for something else, e.g. how to leave a relationship, or whatever they are actually discussing at this point in their proceedings.
     
  6. kakum Junior Member

    Japanese
    Opening night, two actors, who are not in the play, are visiting their friend at backstage. And leaving her dressing room, they say "Well, can you think of an exit line? " "Sure".

    In this context, can we imagine that they are talking about the ending, how this play ends, etc?
     
  7. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Unlikely. It sounds more like a bit of a pun on the fact that they are leaving her room. Nothing to do with a performance on stage. What is the next line after this?
     
  8. kakum Junior Member

    Japanese
    A: Well, can you think of an exit line?
    B: Sure. You got two dollars?
    A: Yes.
    B: Come on, I’ll buy you a drink.
    A: Alright. I…
    B: But, but, but, but, but, but, but, but…
    A:We’ll be pulling for you(to an actress).
    B: Good luck. I thought I’d catch you.

    I can't understand the point of the pun.....
     
  9. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    I'm not sure if B is offering to sell A an exit line for two dollars (my guess), or if she's suggesting that "You got two dollars" be their exit line (certainly possible).

    Is this a real-life conversation, or from a movie, or what? I'm guessing there are some private jokes in there that only the participants will understand.

    There is approximately zero chance that they are talking about an actual exit line in a show. I'm reasonably sure they're saying "Well, we need to leave now, but we're performers, so we'll try to come up with something witty to say as we leave."
     
  10. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Puns do not have any point apart from raising a small smile. Is is mildly amusing for actors leaving another performer's room to use the phrase exit line as they actually leave the room. Puns work by using words from one context in another. They are rarely very funny. This example is not very funny and is not intended to be.
     
  11. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Where did you find these lines? I am surprised we have gone so far without a moderator pointing out the rules on indicating sources!
     

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