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fabricated, invented

Discussion in 'English Only' started by High on grammar, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. High on grammar Senior Member

    Farsi
    [FONT=&quot]Hello everyone:[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot]Does “fabricated” or “invented” collocate with “charges” in the sentence below?[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]Since her arrest, they’ve..............charges against her.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]A) invented B) fabricated[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    I believe both are perfectly fine. But according to Oxford Thesaurus Dictionary the only word to collocate with “charges” is “trump up”, not “fabricate” nor “invent” or even “ make up” .[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]Thanks[/FONT]
     
  2. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    Trumped-up charges is a rather casual or journalistic way of referring to false charges; I don't think it would be so commonly used as a verb (The police trumped up charges against her). Fabricate is a more formal word for it, and is used for intentionally false things - a fabricated story (a lie or false alibi), a fabricated CV, a fabricated explanation. It sounds like the serious and appropriate word in your sentence. Invent is possible too, but is much more open to possibilities: inventing charges could mean making up entirely new charges, like negligent use of an umbrella, being drunk while holding a balloon, or walking too close to flower beds. If the police fabricated charges, they would stick to existing offences like murder and driving without a licence.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  3. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    "Fabricated", "trumped up", and "made up" would all work here, but I'd use fabricated. ("Invented" wouldn't be completely wrong, but I agree with EntangledBank that it's too broad a term.)
     
  4. High on grammar Senior Member

    Farsi
    Thanks
     

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