farina manitoba

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by classici italiani, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. Che cosa farina manitoba? Ho visto quest' ingrediente in una ricetta per il lievito madre.
     
  2. Yulan

    Yulan Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Ciao Classici :)

    You may be willing to have a look here: FARINA MANITOBA

    Ciao :)
     
  3. Lucy Van Pelt Senior Member

    Florence, Italy
    Italian
    La farina manitoba è una farina ad alto potere lievitante, di solita usata per il pane.

    In altri Paesi diversi dall'Italia la "forza" della farina è indicata chiaramente sulla confezione con un numero preceduto da W.

    In Italia, o si compra la farina Manitoba, oppure si cerca la farina con la più alta percentuale possibile di proteine.
    Altra possiblità: comprare la farina dai mulini o dai grossisti, in sacchi da 25 kg o anche più, dove viene sempre indicata la forza.
     
  4. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Nei supermercati inglesi si vende "strong flour" per panificazione; credo che sia questa. Probabilmente la trovi anche in Australia.
     
  5. anglomania1

    anglomania1 Senior Member

    Piacenza, Italy
    UK English
    Ciao Einstein:),
    sono arrivata all conclusione che si dice "strong flour". I libri di ricette per fare il pane (in inglese) consigliano "strong flour" perché lievita meglio (contiene più glutine). Ho provato a fare il pane con la macchina con farina normale e farina manitoba e il pane lievita il doppio con quest'ultima.
    Credo che strong flour = manitoba.
    Anglo
     
  6. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Thanks for the confirmation:):thumbsup: I've seen it lately at the Coop!
     
  7. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Manitoba flour.:) I think it is the equivalent of the (very) strong flour we use in the UK to make bread, read this discussion about Canadian vs. European flour.;)
     
  8. Grazie! Penso che abbia comprato la farina giusta!
     
  9. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  10. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    So does this person, in a pretty extensive treatment of Italian flours.
    Unfortunately it looks like I may have been misled with farina di farro = spelt flour...
     
  11. Pietruzzo Senior Member

    Salento
    Italiano
    You know we also call it "farina americana". Don't you?
     
  12. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    Yes. I thought I read it in this thread, but evidently not! Thanks.
     
  13. anglomania1

    anglomania1 Senior Member

    Piacenza, Italy
    UK English
    And I'm assuming it's not just a preference, but the fact that the flour actually comes from Manitoba, in Canada.
    This from wiki's page on the Manitoba province:
    Conosciuto nel mondo per l'alta qualità delle farine prodotte che, avendo un "indice di forza" molto alto, risultavano particolarmente adatte alla panificazione. Il termine manitoba è ormai divenuto sinonimo di "farina forte" qualsiasi sia il luogo di produzione
     
  14. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    I think you’re right, but it isn’t to be found worldwide so I need to find a more generic translation.
     
  15. anglomania1

    anglomania1 Senior Member

    Piacenza, Italy
    UK English
    "Strong bread flour" is pretty general and understandable by everyone, I think
    Anglo:)
     
  16. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    Yeah, that’s what I decided on in #10, though I didn’t make it very clear.
     
  17. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Just to add my 2 Canadian cents, I've never heard of wheat being called "Manitoba wheat" nor "strong bread flour" either. I wouldn't know what they meant. (I mean I do know that Manitoba grows a lot of wheat but not that it had a particular name) I believe we call this simply "bread flour". And I did find this
    American flours and British equivalents:
    Cake and pastry flour = soft flour
    All-purpose flour = plain flour
    Bread flour = strong flour, hard flour
    Self-rising flour = self-raising flour
    Whole-wheat flour = wholemeal flour
     
  18. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    Just think, a whole country can’t get enough of your wheat, and you were (presumably) unawares! It has its own Italian Wikipedia page that links to no other language.

    Do we have to look for the anti-Canadians among the Canadians themselves? Certainly some of Italy’s worst critics are Italian...
     
  19. sorry66

    sorry66 Senior Member

    France
    English, England
    @rrose17 We say 'bread flour' as well as 'strong (bread) flour'.
    I'm sure you can't buy packets of flour with 'soft' and 'hard' written on them - don't they describe the grain?
     
  20. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    "I'm sure you can't buy packets of flour with 'soft' and 'hard' written on them - don't they describe the grain?"

    A small doubt here: in Italy, hard wheat (durum wheat, grano duro) is something different. Its flour is pale yellow, the consistency is free-flowing and it's used for making pasta. It also makes excellent (pale yellow) bread, but it's different from "Manitoba flour", which is white and, despite the name "strong", is a variety of "grano tenero", or soft wheat. Comments, anyone?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
  21. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'm glad I'm not the only one who never heard of "Manitoba flour" before coming to Italy, nor of "strong bread flour" until now! [And my nickname at University was "the mad baker":rolleyes:]. I will add that "cake flour" usually contains some starch (amido o fecola) as well as flour, to make a lighter cake. I always add corn starch (amido di mais) to all-purpose flour, to make my own.

    I've often had the same doubt, Einstein. I've always seen "Farina 0" indicated for bread and pizza, and "Farina 00" indicated for cakes and sweets. When I asked about the difference, I was told that Farina 00 was "setacciata" (sifted).

    [Of course all of the above is moot, as nowadays I use (and mix) only gluten-free flourn :D]
     
  22. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Yes, that's yet another question. The 0 and 00 indications are about the milling (or sifting); they are made from the same (ordinary) wheat. "Farina 0" is recommended for bread and pizza, but it's not as good as "Manitoba" flour.
     
  23. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    A company called Marriage's mills and sells Manitoba flour in the UK. I can't post the link, obviously, but costco describes it thus: 'The ultimate flour for long fermentation baking. Manitoba is exceptionally strong having been milled from 100% Canadian Spring wheat'.
     
  24. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Just to add that more than half the wheat grown in Canada comes from the province of Saskatchewan, which is next to Manitoba, but probably impossible for most Italians to pronounce. :D
     
  25. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    It's given in the internet as səˈskætʃəwən. Maybe a simplified version for Italians could be sascàcciuan?:D
     

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