Favorite Words or Phrases

Discussion in 'Cultural Discussions' started by Jeremy Sharpe, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. Jeremy Sharpe Junior Member

    Canada, English
    Languages are very beautiful things, as we all know, and sometimes a phrase or word just strikes you as beautiful. So, post them here! You can do it in any language you want.

    French:
    I don't know a lot of vocabulary in French, but I love the way 'Ce dont j'ai besoin...' rolls off the tongue (and rhymes too).

    English:
    I like the word 'annexation' right now... I can't really explain why. 'x's are good I guess. :)
     
  2. scandalously in love

    scandalously in love Senior Member

    Canada - English
    oooh ooh oooh!

    pourrais-je tout simplement dire, que j'adore l'expression
    "Franchement!" en français, (avec plusieurs sortes d'accents!)

    (frééénchment, fronchmont, fronchméént... lol....)

    En anglais, on n'a pas ni mot ni phrase tant copieuse que cela... c'est même mieux avec un bon "Ben" québécois avant....

    Ben, franchement là!

    je pourrais m'exprimer toutes mes émotions avec ce mot-là! ;)
     
  3. Jeremy Sharpe Junior Member

    Canada, English
    Est-ce que le mot 'franchement' veut dire 'frankly' en Anglais? Comment y a-t-il tous ces sens differents?
     
  4. mirandolina

    mirandolina Senior Member

    Padua, Italy
    Scotland - English
    One of my favourite German words is Gummihandschuh - it only means rubber glove, but I love the sound of it!
     
  5. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    When I used to speak German, I loved saying "wissenschaftlich". All these ssssssss and schhhhhhh !!
     
  6. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    You're not a remote descendant of the Schickelgruber family, are you? ;)
    Thought not. I'll get my coat... :)
     
  7. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    I love this " ... , though"
    To tell the truth, I don't like this word, and it's been very difficult for me to understand.
    But, the fact is that mi amiga mejor, mi unicornio, always says that, and I like the way she does it... so now it is my favourite phrase... ;) :p :)

    In German I like this "ich auch" because the sound is terrible. For instance you say "Ich liebe dich" and then the other person says "Ich auch", but the sound of these words is so sharp -it sounds like an order, hee hee, that is kind of contradictory...well... it's my opinion..(I hope this is well written, if not my friend Who will correct it, right Who...?) :thumbsup:

    In French I like "je ne sais pas" and "qu'est ce que vous cherchez?"... the sounds are mmmm....so smooth, so sweet...you put your lips in a certain position... :rolleyes:

    In Irish >>> Ble wyt ti isio mynd? I'r dafarn = Where are you going? To the pub... ;)

    and in my last acquisition...Italian... "cosa significa questa parola?"... :D
     
  8. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Have you noticed there are many sssssss and shhhhhhh in the proposed words/phrases ? Very interesting, indeed..... :idea:
     
  9. belén

    belén Ex-Moderator

    Spain
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    In German I like the way this sentences sound:
    Uber natürlich - But of course
    Uberhaubt nicht - Absolutely no way
    Ich bin entaucht - I am disappointed

    In Spanish I like:
    Encarecidamente - earnestly
    Alcachofa - Artichoke

    In English I am more into monosyllabes, my favorites being:
    Few
    Bib

    In Portuguese I like mostly all words :) but I will chose these 2 today
    Allem - Beyond
    Foz - Falls (as in the Iguaçu Falls)

    And in Catalan I like
    Pastanaga - Carrot

    Now, psychologists, please proceed...

    Cheers,
    Be
     
  10. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Yes, it's funny. The same goes for 'Gummiball (rubber ball)' - also funny in English. The best German word is "Flummi" I don't even know how to translate it. Maybe someone can.

    "Ich auch" is correct. I like to pronounce it, but as for "ich liebe dich - ich auch", I have to teach you it's not the best way to say it. We Germans do it better: We add one more a 'ch' to make a finer pronunciation:

    Ich liebe dich, mein Schatz. — Ich dich auch.
    I love you, darling. — I love you, too.

    The best English word ever created is Mississippi. And the best German word is Rehabilitation. I don't manage its pronunciation. The best French one is "propriétaire", because that's almost the first word I learned and it's still hard to pronounce.
     
  11. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Before some psychologists proceeds anything, I HAVE to correct your German examples.
     
  12. belén

    belén Ex-Moderator

    Spain
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca

    Thankssssssss!!!!!! Long time no study German :(
     
  13. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    Danke schön, mein Lehrer!!! :thumbsup: I knew Who would have something to say!! ;) I'm always expecting Who's corrections... thank you!!!!

    PS: That's why it sounded odd... you don't have to say "ich auch" when someone says "Ich liebe dich".... uuuhhhh!!!... I used to say that... poor my love..... :eek:
     
  14. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    For sound and sense, the Portuguese word Saudade is a favorite.

    http://www.saturation.org/saturationblog/archives/000824.html

    saludos,
    Cuchuflete
     
  15. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Not only that you DON'T HAVE to say it, you SHOULDN'T say it. It sounds really odd.
     
  16. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Now that I see it in print,
    is also nice, in a silly way.
    The sound is like that of shsssssssing a rowdy person in a theatre or concert, and the word is so pompous as to be amusing.
     
  17. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng


    Danke vielmals Who!!! Ich verspreche "ich dich auch" fürder sagen !! ;)
     
  18. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
  19. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    De nada, amiga. What does the underlined word mean? Say it in Spanish or English, please.
     
  20. scandalously in love

    scandalously in love Senior Member

    Canada - English

    Yes, its true, but the word goes much farther than that...

    Think about it, how often do you say frankly? Besides, you can also say "Etre frânche" to get that meaning. You could use franchement to mean, frankly: ie. Franchement, je pense que le bleu ne va pas avec le rouge.

    However, franchement is often said as an expression when you're surprised, confused, angry, etc, etc. The closest translations I can come up with, is a mixture of "for crying out loud", "what the heck" and "you can't be serious".... all rolled into one.

    ie. "Il m'a dit que maintenant, il ne vient jusqu'a samedi... franchement!!"
     
  21. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    I love the way the word "perception" sounds in English. I don't like its equivalent in French, though. Maybe because one of its meaning is related to paying taxes!;)
     
  22. supercrom Banned

    Cercado de Lima, Lima, Perú
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    I really like these phrases:

    Je nai sais pa.
    because I can say that when someone says to me "Parlez-vous français?" (click)

    Não falo português.
    Idem

    what's the matter?
    I like this but especially with a British accent.

    CROM
     
  23. ceirun Senior Member

    UK / English
    Hi Artrella, this isn't Irish but Welsh. :) (I like the sentence, though :thumbsup: ).

    One of my favourite words in English is "gobbledegook" ...just because it sounds so unusual.
     
  24. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Is there a difference in usage to goobbledygook? Both of them sound funny, but what's the correct one?
     
  25. ceirun Senior Member

    UK / English
    Hi whodunit,

    It's funny you should ask that, because I actually had to check the spelling before writing it.

    In my Oxford dictionary it says "gobbledegook", but looking in Google, there is at least one other variation. Take a look here: http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-gob1.htm
     
  26. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Thank you Ceirun,

    I hope it's clear now. ;)
     
  27. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Maintenant, tu sais ! :)
     
  28. mjscott Senior Member

    I like the words:
    albaricoque
    and any word that is an esdrújula--for the musicality of it.

    I like the word
    esperanza
    in Spanish. In English, hope can be quantified by the measure of hope the person hoping has in something. In Spanish, la esperanza means the waiting. It's as if hope has transcended hopelessness, and is now a matter of waiting for what you hope for to come to pass. It's a much stronger word than the English word hope.
     
  29. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    Hi Ceirun... I knew Welsh and I wasn't aware of it..... :eek:
    OOHHHH!!! OK, I will have to go to the pubs in Wales!!! ha ha ha !!! :thumbsup: Maybe with the Prince of Wales...mmmmm...naawwww!!!!!! :thumbsdown:


    But I will go to the pub in Dublin, and have some pints there..hic!! :D >>> Go dtí an teach tábhairne
     
  30. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng


    Ahhhh mein Freund!! Du weisst nicht?... Dieses Wort bedeutet "in future".
    At least that is what my LEO dictionary says!!! :p Whooooo!!! Why cannot I have one ... only one... a single...sentence totally correct...uuuffaaaaa!!! :D
     
  31. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Nein, ich wusste nicht. What a word :eek: . Hm, LEO is wrong, I've never heard it, but it's also marked as obsolete/archaic. Nevertheless, I think you created a thread in the German forum right now. ;)
     
  32. ceirun Senior Member

    UK / English
    Hi Art. I can't blame you about not wanting to go to the pub with him :thumbsup: ...but funnily enough, "The Prince of Wales" is actually quite a popular pub name in the UK (you can have a look at the 10 most popular ones here: http://www.camra.org.uk/SHWebClass.ASP?WCI=ShowDoc&DocID=3607), so at least you could go to a pub with that name, without having to share his company. ;)
     
  33. beatrizg Senior Member

    Colombia, Spanish
    My contribution will be in Spanish and Greek, guys.

    A very dear person of mine was called in her youth
    "El alacran dorado".
    I not only like the sound, but I also find it poetical.

    The Greek language is very musical. I like the name of the island of Serifos... there is a small taverna there calle Kyklopas (Ciclope). The word for sea, Thalassa...

    There are so many more I could think of...
     
  34. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    Spanish has a great many words which sounded very exotic when I first came across them. It was a bit of a let-down when I found out the meaning of one of my favourites, 'basura'. It means 'rubbish'.
     
  35. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Ohhh I have so many...

    Yadda, yadda....of course..meaning..and so on..
    Supercalafragalisticexpialidocious...from Mary Poppins..
    Homonym...funny if you say it fast about ten times...
    Zymurgy...or any word that starts with Z...

    In German...
    Das ist kaputt...

    In Dutch..
    Lieveling...means..darling...My mother calls me that (among other things :eek: )

    In Spanish/Mexican...
    Te Quiero..awww

    One of my favorite sayings...
    If wishes were horses...(aww..sounds so nice..until you say the rest of it)
    I would ride the Hell out of here !!

    te gato;)
     
  36. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    The most beautiful word ever...

    CAXIGALINES

    (Asturian) :)
     
  37. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    :D Yes, basura is a very nice word if we forget its meaning :rolleyes:
     
  38. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Another super English word: "whatchamacallit, what-d'ye-call-it, what-'em-call-it etc."
     
  39. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    Y thingamabob :D
     
  40. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Y thingumajig. :D :D
     
  41. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    One I haven't heard in years, but still brings back nice memories:

    Monkeyshines

    abrazos,
    Cuchu
     
  42. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Isn't it monkeyshines?
     
  43. supercrom Banned

    Cercado de Lima, Lima, Perú
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    We should never lose even a bit of esperanza...

    We can easily see that a word is esdrújula because it always holds an accent mark.

    CROM
     
  44. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    Not to mention doobry.
     
  45. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    Does "doobry" mean the same? I could not find it.
     
  46. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    What is "monkeyshines" Cuchu? :confused:
     
  47. weird Senior Member

    SPAIN
    Hello, ¡que thread tan gracioso!

    My favourite word is: WEIRD (for this reason it is my nickname)

    I love: ache, almighty, always, ankle, awkward, because, cellar, chemistry, crimson, ice, lizard, luck, mistake, mortgage, necklace, nowhere, owl, purple, scare, shark, snake, swallow, tear, tiptoe, twice, wander, weather, winding, witch, wrinkle, yourself and zip.

    ¡me encanta el sonido de estas palabras! ¡para un "oido español", son bastante musicales!

    En cuanto a las frases:

    THE BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER
    LIKE THE CAT ON THE HOT TIN ROOF

    Aunque para mi gusto, todo me suena bien en inglés :)

    Saludos.- :)
     
  48. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    I would say the following are my favorites:

    callipygian
    ass goblin: (Note: could be considered offensive)
    posh
    Amurica (emphasising pronunciation)
     
  49. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    I told you not to mention doobry! :)

    It means the same here in the UK, at least that's the only way I've heard it used. For example, "Pass me the doobry, will you?". I've even heard "doobry-whatsit" on a couple of occasions.
     
  50. pinkpanter

    pinkpanter Senior Member

    Thank you Garry!
     

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