fecha / date: the 17th

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by hedgy, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. hedgy Senior Member

    Catalan
    I've just read this:
    We will meet you in London on the 17th
    I know everything they say about the use of the in dates. But I do not understand why it is used like this in a reading.
     
  2. Trailbosstom

    Trailbosstom Senior Member

    Arizona
    American English
    Perhaps this is what is happening: The definite article "the" very often goes with the preposition "of." The back of the room... etc. "the 17th" is short for: "the 17th of February" for example.
     
  3. hedgy Senior Member

    Catalan
    Can anyone help me, please?
     
  4. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    I guess you're referring to the fact that the rule is generally that we SAY "the" before a date but don't WRITE it. Perhaps in this case the writer is just writing what was actually said, as in dialogue.
     
  5. hedgy Senior Member

    Catalan
    It is a letter, it is not a dialogue, so that's why I don't understand why they write the when you only use it when talking.
     
  6. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    Well, in a letter, we often write as we speak, even if it is grammatically "incorrect".
     
  7. hedgy Senior Member

    Catalan
    Yes, it's true
    Thank you
     
  8. donbill

    donbill Senior Member / Moderator

    South Carolina / USA
    English - American
    I see nothing wrong with the sentence as it is written! "We will meet you in London on the 17th [day of the month].":confused:
     
  9. levmac

    levmac Senior Member

    No longer here.
    There is nothing wrong with the sentence! The only time "the" is omitted, is when we write a full date.

    Today's date: Tueday 19th November.

    In a sentence, you couldn't write, "We will meet you in London on 17th".

    Nor would I write, necessarily, "He was born 6th November". This form is often used in articles and encyclopaedias, but in many written formats, it looks telegraphic; it is an abbreviation.

    In a book, I imagine you will find both forms. When a character is speaking, it would be weird to abbreviate it like that.
     
  10. donbill

    donbill Senior Member / Moderator

    South Carolina / USA
    English - American
    It would not be unusual in AmE to see or hear: "I'll see you in London on the 19th of November. Most of the time we don't use the formula "19th November" or "19 November," unless we're trying to sound British. :)
     
  11. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    Though we wouldn't normally say "19 November".
     
  12. levmac

    levmac Senior Member

    No longer here.
    But the point still holds - you still use "the".

    Americans used November 19(th) in the same way Britons use "19(th) November" - as an abbreviated form common in bylines and the other contexts I explained. When space is at a premium, as in newspapers, it's usual to omit the "th".
     

Share This Page