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figurative meanings of fluffy pussy

Discussion in 'English Only' started by narajan, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. narajan Senior Member

    persian
    In many Agatha Christie's works, an old lady like Jane Marple is always described as "fluffy old pussy". What does the writer mean by "fluffy pussy"? Why does she call her "fluffy'? Why does she call her "pussy"? Can anybody explain? thanks
     
  2. Cypherpunk Senior Member

    Springdale, AR
    US, English
    This is definitely not the modern meaning of the word pussy. Ms. Christie is undoubtedly referring to a fat, possibly very fluffy, cat. These types of cats are often prissy, deliberate, and not terribly active.
     
  3. narajan Senior Member

    persian
    But still I can't make out why does she refer to an old lady like Jane Marple as a fluffy cat? What is the figurative meaning of fluffy cat?
     
  4. Starfrown

    Starfrown Senior Member

    Columbia, SC
    English - US
    I agree. I couldn't read the original post without something of a grin, despite myself. You should probably absolutely avoid the term "pussy," meaning "cat," in contemporary English, as it has almost entirely given way to its vulgar meaning (number 2), which has an entirely different derivation.
     
  5. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    As cypherpunk said :These types of cats are often prissy, deliberate, and not terribly active. That is the figurative meaning: Jane Marple is often prissy, deliberate, and not terribly active.
     
  6. nontan Junior Member

    Japanese
    Having checked through the Internet, I happened to come across a term of “a fluffy bunny” whose primary meaning is said to be a one who refuses to learn, refuses to think, and refuses to consider the possibility that they could possibly ever be wrong. For me as a non native English speaker, the cat character and behavior make much more sense in the context than those of the bunny.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2010
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    For me the primary connotations of "fluffy old pussy" (in the Agatha Christie context) are "sweet and inoffensive"; but I agree that "prissy, deliberate, and not terribly active" could also come in there somewhere. A contrast is being drawn between the dear little old lady that Miss Marple appears to be on the surface and the 'razor-sharp sleuth' that lies within.
     
  8. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    "Oh dear me, yes, I do see what you mean, Ms Loob." said Miss Marple with a knowing glint in her eye :D

    The apparently not terribly active (mentally or physically) is the fluffy , or insubstantial, part of the metaphor and pussycats are usually inoffensive and sweet, but of course that can be a disguise.
     
  9. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    It would have been very helpful to have had some context to go with out general commentary, I'd say. Surely a sample sentence wouldn't have gone amiss?
     

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