1. mathou New Member

    Singapore
    french, France
    bonjour,

    j'aurais besoin d'une traduction en anglais de l'expression fils ou fille a papa ?
    merci d avance.
     
  2. doodlebugger Senior Member

    France
    There is daddy's boy or daddy's girl, but I am not sure they have the same meaning in English.
    Could you provide more context?

    And welcome to the forum :)
     
  3. babette New Member

    english, usa
    i am pretty sure you're right,
    daddy's boy/girl.
     
  4. RuK Senior Member

    Outside Paris
    English/lives France
    un fils à papa = someone young, weak, growing up in the shadow of (or heavily assisted by) his father. I think "Daddy's boy" is OK but surely there's better?
     
  5. alisonp Senior Member

    London
    English - UK
    I'm not sure about RuK's definition. 'Daddy's boy/girl' can just mean a child who's rather more attached to his/her father than to the mother.
     
  6. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Yes, it can, but it can also mean what Ruk said.

    "Mummy's boy", on the other hand, is usually pejorative.
     
  7. Wodwo Senior Member

    London UK
    UK English
    I'm not sure that 'daddy's boy' exists as a term corresponding to 'fils à papa', though it could be used in the sense mentioned by alisonp. At least that's how it would be understood - I don't think it's a set phrase in itself.

    A 'mummy's boy' of school age or over is a pejorative term describing a boy who is over-protected by his mother and goes along with it, but unfortunately it won't work just to substitute one parent with the other.

    I can't think of anything for 'fils à papa' other than a paraphrase - 'boy who strives to please his father'? 'boy dominated by his father'? - these seem a little strong. There is 'chip off the old block', but that's more a boy who is like his father - and probably shares his values.

    Any ideas, precisions anyone?

    Just discovered 'rich kid' in the other thread - sounds good to me, though the specific nuance isn't there. But rich kids are rich because their parents are rich, so there's the idea of dependency and immaturity.

    Anyone agree? Disagree?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 16, 2010
  8. LGT Senior Member

    English (England)
    Even if you agree that all rich kids are daddy's boys/girls, it cannot be reasoned that all daddy's boys/girls are rich kids.

    Daddy's boy would be understood in Br En, but it is not really common usage, unlike mummy's boy or daddy's girl. This isn't very helpful, sorry!
     
  9. Wodwo Senior Member

    London UK
    UK English
    We need a native francophone on this, because I think 'fils à papa' implies a rich family. At least that's the context I think I've always seen it in. Cushioned upbringing, father's pride and joy, that kind of thing. I think.

    And I'm a Brit too, but I can't imagine 'daddy's boy' being used of, say, an 18 year-old, which my 'fils à papa' may be. If used at all it would be, as alisonp suggests, a little boy who loves his dad.
     
  10. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    I confirm that "fils à papa" implies a rich father , just like "fille à papa" (Paris Hilton for instance)
    we often use in the case of scandals implying the sons of some ministers or even higher ... !

    :=)
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2010
  11. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    I concur with Micia, un fils à papa or une fille à papa has nothing to do with being the favourite of one's parent nor with being other protected. As a matter of fact, many "fils et filles à papa" are actually brought up by their nurses... It just means you have rich parents to support you with their money and friends. But, unlike "rich kid" it's rather a derogatory expression, or at least pejorative. You mean by that "people who'd be nothing without their parents". Any idea of a translation ?
     
  12. Wodwo Senior Member

    London UK
    UK English
    'Rich kid' is pretty derogatory too - it's dismissive, the person is infantilized and defined by their parents' wealth. I think there is a subliminal idea in both 'fils à papa' and 'rich kid' that the person has been cushioned from the realities of the world by their parents' money - whether or not they have been brought up by a servant - and it's getting in the way of their full adulthood, stopping them being taken seriously.

    If you wanted to describe the child of wealthy parents in a more neutral way, you might say just that, or 'x was from a wealthy family'. You probably wouldn't even use the word 'rich', which is a bit raw somehow unless their wealth is uncontroversial public knowledge, and you certainly wouldn't use 'kid' because the register suggests someone who is not being taken seriously by the speaker.
     
  13. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    Your definition of a "rich kid" perfectly matches that of "un fils à papa", so let's stick to that.:)
     
  14. amylya New Member

    Australia
    English - United States
    I'm working on a similar translation, but the sentence is "On n'embauche que des fils à papa" to which I suggest the use of "good ol' boys" or the idea of "good ol' boys club." However, this is only valid for the U.S. South (and parts of the Mid-West, I would argue). See the Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_ol'_boy
     
  15. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    Welcome amylya :)
    "good ol' boys club" or "good ol' boys network" as proposed in the link sounds perfect in your context. Indeed "les fils à papa" are (usually rightly) blamed for being given priority when it comes to jobs. Too bad it only works in the south of the U.S.
    Thanks for your input.
     
  16. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Not quite. Drop the word "good" and you have "old boys' network", which is standard BE. It is usually assumed that "old boy" means "former pupil / alumnus" and suggests you give favours to old school friends. So some of the connotations of fils à papa, but far from being a precise equivalent.
     
  17. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    Strangely enough, to me "un fils / une fille / à papa" never works (or just makes as if) provided they don't need any money ...
     
  18. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    The sad thing with money is the more you get, the more you want, so that even les fils/filles à papa may work – that is get highly paid jobs – or they can get appointed to a board of directors for which they get a fee for their mere presence...

    But wouldn't you say that les fils/filles à papa go to the same small set of schools and universities, so that, although it's not exactly the same (there are also a few sudents with scholarships in those schools), it's not that different either?
     
  19. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    That's what I meant! :D
     
  20. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Not if it's the equivalent of the English "spoilt child" or "daddy's boy". These people can be found in all walks of life, I think.
     
  21. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    I'd say fils/fille à papa implies the father has a lot of power, money, connections. It's not the same as a spoilt child – which is enfant gâté, or even "pourri gâté". It rather means that their social position isn't due to their merits but to their parents' social position. It means they didn't have to struggle for what they have. They're the exact opposite of self-made men or women.
     
  22. Santana2002 Senior Member

    France
    English, from Ireland
    What about the expression: He's his father's son (alright), which is in the sense that a boy has the same behaviour as his father, is following in his father's footsteps, shares many characteristics with his father?
     
  23. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    I think it's the equivalent of the French "C'est (bien) le fils de son père".
    There's a likeness (whether physical or psychological) between father and son implied there, which is not the case with "fils à papa".
     
  24. Santana2002 Senior Member

    France
    English, from Ireland
    Ah okay, thanks for clarifying! :)
     
  25. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    not to mix with "c'est bien le fils à sa maman", meaning the guy has no personality and follows his mother's decisions even when 30 and more. This kind of guy usualy remains bachelor ....
     

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