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first cousin once removed

Discussion in 'English Only' started by eddiemel7778, May 30, 2009.

  1. eddiemel7778 Senior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese/Brazil
    Hi there! I have a question. When I say, for instance, that Juan is my first cousin once removed, who is his mother? My father's sister, my grandfather's sister or my great grandfather's sister?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Kevin Beach

    Kevin Beach Senior Member

    S(h)e is either the child of your first cousin or the first cousin of your parent.

    The relatives you have suggested are your aunt, your great aunt, and your great great aunt.
     
  3. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    There's a previous thread here:
    cousin removed

    I've never understood all this "first cousin once removed"/"second cousin" stuff, and I suspect I never will, now:(

    Ah well....
     
  4. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    I answered this question on the Spanish-English board; my answer is in English, and I think it might help you.

    You can see that thread here -- jsut scroll down to my response.
     
  5. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Excellent post, GWB!

    But I know I'll never remember it:(
     
  6. eddiemel7778 Senior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese/Brazil
    GreenWhiteBlue,
    Thank you so very much. Now it makes sense to me. Your explanation was just perfect and simple to understand.
     
  7. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    I am glad you liked that explanation, eddiemel. I think that you will now understand when I say, in response to your original question (When I say, for instance, that Juan is my first cousin once removed, who is his mother?) that there are two possible answers.

    The first possible answer is that Juan's mother is your first cousin. One of your parents and a parent of Juan's mother are siblings, and your grandparents and Juan's great-grandparents are the same man and woman.

    The second possible answer is that Juan's mother is your great-aunt, and the sister of your grandfather or your grandmother. Juan is the first cousin of your father or your mother. Juan's grandparents and your great-grandparents are the same man and woman.

    What "once removed" indicates is that while you have common ancestors, you do not have the same number of generations between yourselves and the common ancestor.
     
  8. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Thank you for this succinct summary of the concept. I don't think I have ever encountered such a clear, straightforward explanation of the "once removed" phrase.
     
  9. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    This picture from one of Panj's links has the genealogy tree and labels to make it very easy to understand. Very highly recommended for comprehension of all of this. A "remove" is a difference of one generation either way.
     
  10. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Nice diagram, Julian!

    I once understood Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity for - ooh - about three minutes. I always feel the same about once removed etc. Perhaps the diagram will help me stretch it to five minutes. I'll print it out.
     
  11. kalamazoo Senior Member

    US, English
    It doesn't have to be Juan's mother who is the relative. It could also be that Juan's father is the one who is the speaker's relative. The terminology would be exactly the same. My mother's sister's grandson is my first cousin once removed, but so is my father's sister's grandson or my mother's brother's grandson or my father's brother's grandson.
     
  12. Ferrydog Senior Member

    Hampshire UK
    English
    For consistency, the brother/sister of one's grandparent should be called a granduncle/grandaunt (not greatuncle, etc). Similarly a brother/sister of one's great-grandparent should be a great-granduncle, etc., thereby keeping the count of greats and grands equal. Works of reference seem to be a bit ambivalent on this.

    I blame the Wombles and their Great Uncle Bulgaria (sic).
     
  13. kalamazoo Senior Member

    US, English
    Or perhaps your grandmother should be your greatmother instead. But the nomenclature is what it is, and we are stuck with it.
     
  14. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Whenever I need to know the correct way of naming an obscure relative I've just found* through researching my family tree, I turn to WordReference for an explanation. I now know that the lady in question is my fourth cousin, once removed:eek:

    (*Actually, it's the first time this has happened.)
     

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