1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

first slice of bread

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Thomas1, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello,

    We have in Polish some names (they are rather used in informal registers) for the first slice of bread, I've been thinking myself if there's such a term in English, as well. Do you use any special name for the first sliced piece of bread in your area/country?

    Thanks in advance,
    Thomas
     
  2. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Hi Thomas,

    I don't know of any specific name for the first slice but the outside of the bread is known as the 'crust'. There is the top, bottom and side crusts. The first and the last slice of bread are generally known as the end crusts.
     
  3. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Could it be a heel of bread?

    Jana
     
  4. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    As a native AE speaker, I can corroborate this-- it's exactly right. And right out of the oven, the lowly heel is the best part of the loaf.
    .
     
  5. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    The heel of the loaf! That's it! Apparently if a woman prefers the heel of the loaf when she's pregnant then she's going to have a boy.
     
  6. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    And, as another native AE speaker, I can state that heel is both correct and a pretty uncommon usage, at least in the eastern part of the U.S.

    I usually hear "crust" or, once in a while, "end piece".
     
  7. jinti

    jinti Senior Member

    Really? I generally say "heel". (I was born and raised in Pennsylvania, and now find myself unable to escape from New York. ;) ) "End" would work for me, too.
     
  8. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    You poor "end piece" people-- you're talking about pre-sliced bread! The stuff you buy that way! Worst thing since bleached flour. Or "steam-rolled" oats.
    .
     
  9. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    "End crust" is also used.
     
  10. la reine victoria Senior Member

    In England we call the first slice 'the crust'. My Scottish mother called it 'the heel'.

    There is a term in English - 'upper crust' - which is a reference to the more aristocratic members of society. Only yesterday I learned how this came into being. Centuries ago, at mealtimes, when a new loaf was taken from the oven, the first slice from the top of the loaf (not the ends) was given to the person of the highest social standing (it was considered to be the best piece of the bread) and that person was called 'upper crust'.

    You could class me as 'end crust' since there's nothing I like more than the first slice from a warm loaf, spread thickly with butter!:)
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It's the heel over here (Ireland) as well.
    We fought for it as kids, but they are now often fed to the birds - or the bin.
     
  12. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Agreed jinti, I'd say "heel" also.
     
  13. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    I've always called the first slice of bread an "end piece", but this term also applies to the last slice of bread.
     
  14. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Good point - first slice, last slice - both are heels.

    The OED, strangely (to me), suggests that the heel of a loaf of bread is the top or bottom crust, not either end.
     
  15. My Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, also strangely to me, does not suggest anything :( yet my PWN-Oxford Polish-English says it is a heel. Anyway, in Polish we call it piętka literallymeaning heel. I have even heard the name dupka hehe which literally means a little bottom. :)
     
  16. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    I would have thought from your name, la reine victoria, that you would have been more an upper crust lady. :D
    Australians generally call it the "end bit".
     
  17. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    My father, who is Italian, calls it "il cozzo" which means "butt", so the "butt of the bread".
     
  18. The same down here. :) a little bottom, a little butt, they are both pretty much the same :)
     

Share This Page