1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

flexibilizacion laboral

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Cornflake_Girl85, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. Cornflake_Girl85 New Member

    UK (English)
    Hello!

    I'm having real problems with wording this phrase in English.

    "Bajos costos de manos de obra, barata por la flexibilizaci[FONT=&quot]ó[/FONT]n laboral, sub contraraci[FONT=&quot]ó[/FONT]n por cooperativas de trabajo asociado"

    My attempt is, "[FONT=&quot]Low labour costs, cheap labour relaxation, subcontracting for associative work cooperatives" but it doesn't sound right to me. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thankyou!
    [/FONT]
     
  2. manpares Junior Member

    Chile
    Chile, Spanish
    I think "Low labour costs, cheap (due to/because) labour relaxation, subcontracting for associative work cooperatives".

    I’m not sure if “labour relaxation”.
    The "Flexibilización laboral" is a labour policy to reduce unemployment through non-regular contracts with no health insurance and no social security benefits. It’s a common practice used to avoid payments when some employee is fired.

    I hope it helps.
    Regards!
     
  3. Cornflake_Girl85 New Member

    UK (English)
  4. EliTrans Senior Member

    Madrid
    English - USA
    Hi, I have to translate the same expression, but "relaxation" doesn't sound right to me in this context! Does anyone have other suggestions??
     
  5. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Low costs for manpower, which is cheap due to the liberalisation of the labour market, ....
     
  6. EliTrans Senior Member

    Madrid
    English - USA
    Ok, so you're saying "flexibilizacion" would translate to "liberalization" in this context??
     
  7. Ernesto Franco Junior Member

    English - USA
    Liberalization sounds better to me as well. I like Aztlaniano´s sentence. I´m unclear what cooperativas de trabajo asociado means, though (in English or Spanish).
     
  8. EliTrans Senior Member

    Madrid
    English - USA
    Great, thanks!
     
  9. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    The concept is to lessen an employer's commitment to an employee and make it less expensive to hire - and to fire/sack- someone. In turn, that means that workers no longer needed in one job will readily move -willingly or not- to another. Hence "flexibilization".
    In Spain, France and other European countries redundancies/layoffs can be very expensive for employers and many people work for the same company or public institution all their working lives.
    "Liberalization of the labour market" is my stab at it, on the basis of what I've read in the English-language press over the years. Take it for what it's worth. (You could google it, and google "flexibilización laboral", and compare.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012

Share This Page