Following up on the conversation

Discussion in 'English Only' started by volver, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    Hello,


    I got a call from one client today.
    I have to send him an email but I don't know what to say at the beginning of the message.

    Can I say following up on the conversation we had, I confirm.....
    or regarding the conversation we had eralier, I confirm..........

    Can I use both sentences? Are there others that I can use?

    Thank you


    VOLVER
     
  2. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Use your subject line to good effect.

    SUBJECT: Our telephone conversation of 6/25/07, Re: Past due payments (or whatever).

    RE: or Re: is a standard business abbreviation for "Regarding"

    If I am writing about a specific part, purchase order or other very specific item, I will start out with:

    I am writing per the above captioned purchase order. (The purchase order that is referenced in the subject line).

    Then continue your writing.
     
  3. volver Senior Member

    french belgium
    Could you please tell me If i can write an email by saying
    following up on the conversation I had with you, I would like to confirm......



    Thank you


    VOLVER
     
  4. femmefee

    femmefee Senior Member

    Canada
    You may say: With reference to our phone conversation (this morning), I hereby confirm..."
    Hope this helps! :)
     
  5. Smudgette Senior Member

    South of England
    English, England
    Or 'Further to our phone conversation, I would like to confirm (or 'have pleasure in confirming', depending on context) .....'

    'Following up' is not a phrase that would normally be used. You could say just 'following our conversation...' but 'further to' is more generally used.
     
  6. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    Actually, "re" is not an abbreviation at all. It is a form of the Latin word res which means thing, or matter, or affair. In re is Latin for "in the matter of". For esample, a law court might make a decision "in re Smith", which means "in the matter of Smith" or "in the affair of Smith".

    In response to volver's question, I think any and all of the following might work:

    In reference to our earlier conversation, ...
    In connection with our earlier conversation, ...
    In order to confirm what we discussed earlier, I would like to note to you that...
    In regard to our conversation of this morning, I would like to confirm that...
    As we discussed in our conversation earlier today, ...
     

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