Food - take out, to go, carry out

Discussion in 'English Only' started by rafaelgan, Apr 3, 2007.

  1. rafaelgan Senior Member

    U.S.A
    Spanish
    When you are buying food, they ask you if you want to eat it here or what? What is the common phrase? Is it "for here or to go"? or take out, carry out?


    Thanks.
     
  2. Old Novice

    Old Novice Senior Member

    Massachusetts
    USA, English
    In AE, "for here or to go?" is the standard question you're asked at the counter. But if you phone in an order in advance, you will typically say "I want to order take-out."
     
  3. rafaelgan Senior Member

    U.S.A
    Spanish
    How about the words carry out and deliver?
     
  4. Old Novice

    Old Novice Senior Member

    Massachusetts
    USA, English
    I think "carry out" is used less often than "take out", but perhaps it is just a regional difference, since I would definitely understand what it meant in this context.

    "Deliver" is a different service. There are many restaurants where you can "get take-out" by going yourself, but only sometimes does the restaurant offer to deliver the order. There may be an extra charge involved.
     
  5. Tabac Senior Member

    Pacific Northwest (USA)
    U. S. - English
    If there's no surcharge, a tip is expected for the deliverer.....about what you would tip the wait-person.
     
  6. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English

    In UK and Australia, people generally say "Eat-in" and "Take-away".
     
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    So does the question go:
    Do you want an eat-in or a take away?


    Tom
     
  8. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    An alternate version of "for here or to go?" in AE is "to stay or to go?" If ordering at the counter, either might be shortened further by the employee taking the order to "Is that for here?" or "Are you staying?", or even just "To stay?", inflected as a question. If one were going to eat in the restaurant, one would say "yes", but if one were planning on leaving with the food, the answer would be "No, that's to go."
     
  9. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    Usually the staff in restaurants ask "Is that to eat in or take away?" or simply "To eat in or take away?" here the terms used are verbs.
    A take-away is a noun and therefore used differently "I'm going to the Chinese (restaurant) for a take-away, do you want anything?"
    In the restaurant I would say "Can I have that to take away?"
    If I don't know if it's possible to take food away I will ask "Do you do take-away?" Here take-away serves as an adjective describing the food.
     
  10. tottallyoff

    tottallyoff Senior Member

    London
    russian
    In the states: to go.
    in UK: take away.
     
  11. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Not all of the UK: in Scotland, the phrase is "carry out" (pronounced kerry oot):D

    Loob
     
  12. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    In England I've heard "carry out" used to describe bottles bought from a pub to be taken away and drunk elsewhere, but not for food.
     
  13. tottallyoff

    tottallyoff Senior Member

    London
    russian
    Well I live in Dundee, and I heard take away and carry out.
     
  14. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    << Moderator note: Normally we ask you to search before creating a new thread. However, this would hae been difficult to find using "to go" as a search term! Nonetheless I've merged it with an older thread that covers a range of regional answers>>

    Hi,

    What does 'to go' mean in expressions like 'food to go', 'coffee to go' etc.?

    Best

    Simon
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2013
  15. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Prepared food sold at a restaurant to be taken home for consumption.
     
  16. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    "Takeaway," I believe, to BE speakers.
     
  17. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thanks - so is a restaurant selling food to go a "to go restaurant"?
     
  18. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    No, it's a take-away.

    GF..

    UK-EN: at least in my parts of the country it is....
     
  19. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thanks - if I remember rightly, in the UK, if someone sees you carrying some boxes from which the smell of cooked food is coming, if that person asks you, "What's that?" you may answer, "A Chinese takeaway (meal)."

    In the USA etc, in the same situation, would you reply, "A Chinese meal to go"?
     
  20. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would normally just say "Chinese." The smell of food, and the fact that I'm carrying it around, should provide the rest of the information.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  21. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Over here, they say, 'having here or take away?' ;)
    But if the fact that it was a take-away needed to be specified, how would it be said in AmE? A Chinese ...?
     
  22. vivace160 Junior Member

    Hudson Valley, New York
    American English
    If I had to be specific, I personally would say "It's/I have Chinese take-out."


     
  23. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    In my experience in California it's also "Chinese take-out".
     
  24. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks for the excellent help.
     
  25. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    And thanks, vivace and JS for satisfying my curiosity! :)
     

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