Fools never differ

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Tagarela, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. Tagarela Senior Member

    Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
    Português - Brasil
    Hi,

    I would like to have some examples of situation in which I could use the expression "fools never differ".
    My main doubt if I should it when two people do the same thing by chance (without knowing the behaviour of the other person) or when the person A immitates person B.

    For example, in which case, 1) or 2) one should say fools never differ:
    1)I buy a certain pair of shoes and my friend buys the same one in another shop, and then when we meet I could say "Fools never differ"?

    2)Or, I buy it first, and then my friend likes it and resolves to buy it too, so could I say "Fools never differ" in this situation?

    Thank you in advance

    Good bye.:
     
  2. Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Actually, as far as I know, the phrase is "fools seldom differ". It comes from the saying, "Great minds think alike, but fools seldom differ."

    It is usually used in situations where two people have the same tastes, ideas, opinions etc. It basically means that both these people could be equally brilliant, hence the similarity in their brilliant ideas (great minds think alike). Before they get all carried away though, the saying goes on to remind them that a possible explanation is that they are both equally stupid (fools seldom differ).

    Thus, concurring with a person's view could indicate that you two are both wonderfully brilliant, or incurably stupid.
     
  3. Tagarela Senior Member

    Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
    Português - Brasil
    Hi,

    So it is not in the case of immitating one another, but something that occurs spontaneously, right?

    Good bye.:
     
  4. Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    I usually use it in spontaneous situations, like if both of us returned from separate stores with the same pair of shoes. Then I would say, 'Great minds think alike!' I wouldn't use 'Fools seldom differ' because then I'd be implying that my friend and are stupid.
     
  5. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    In that precise situation*, Tagarela, I would say:
    Well, you know what they say: Great minds think alike. Or is it: Fools never differ?

    Note that I would use never rather than seldom (that's just the version I'm 'comfortable' with).

    *Mind you, it's highly unlikely that anyone would ever have the same appalling taste in shoes that I do ...:D
     
  6. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    It's "Fools seldom differ" for me.

    And I've never heard it without a preceding "Great minds think alike".

    The more common expression is "Great minds think alike". And yes, you use it where similar things happen accidentally. I've used it on the forum when I've posted the same answer as another forero...
     
  7. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    "Fools never differ" seems to be afoot on the internet as the initialism FND.

    There is no similar finding for FSD = fools seldom differ.
     
  8. catlady60

    catlady60 Senior Member

    Pennsylvania (20mi/36km from the Poconos
    English-US (New York City)
    My own saying is: Great minds--and not so great minds--think alike!
     

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