FR: admirer les fleurs dans le/du jardin

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by MerePond, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. MerePond Junior Member

    English - Canada
    Hello,

    I can't understand the distinction between these two sentences:

    1) Nous admirons les fleurs dans le jardin. (Textbook note: "dans le jardin" étant un complément de lieu du verbe "admirons")

    2) Nous admirons les fleurs du jardin. (Textbook note: "du jardin" étant un complément déterminatif de nom "fleurs".)

    What is the distinction? In the first sentence is the stress on "admirons"? As in, we admire the flowers in the garden, rather than pick them (for example)?

    And for the second sentence, is the stress on "garden"? As in, we admire the flowers of the garden, and not the flowers growing somewhere else?

    Thanks!
     
  2. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    The way I see it:

    In 1), you are in the garden, admiring its flowers.

    In 2), you are admiring flowers that were in the garden. They have been cut and are now displayed in a vase.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2013
  3. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    1) Nous admirons les fleurs dans le jardin.

    You admire some flowers. Most probably you are in the garden and the flowers are growing there, but this is not necessarily the case. Especially, you may be admiring the flowers that are in the garden from somewhere else, e.g., from a window. In that case, dans le jardin is an ellipsis for qui sont dans le jardin.

    2) Nous admirons les fleurs du jardin.

    De
    (contracted with le to du) may mean either "of" or "from." There are therefore 2 possible meanings:
    a) You may be in any place and you admire the flowers of the garden, either the flowers that are growing in the garden or cut flowers that grew there.
    b) You are in the garden but the flowers are somewhere else. In that case you could replace du with depuis le.
     
  4. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    While I agree with everything that MC wrote, in my opinion this Textbook note about « du jardin » :
    means 2 a). So "of" rather than "from". :)

    Edit : then again, I assume that "from" could also be interpreted as « qui viennent du », but it would also mean 2 a).
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2013
  5. MerePond Junior Member

    English - Canada
    Thank-you everyone,
    Now I understand the difference!
     

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