FR: c'est moi qui / c'est nous qui + accord du verbe (1re personne)

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by nath1, Jun 30, 2006.

  1. nath1 Senior Member

    english
    Hi all, ok is this structure grammatcally correct, "c'est moi qui l'ai fait" if so does this work with the other past participles such as " c'est nous qui l'avons fait" . Also does this also work with the verbs in the passé composé with être. I have not seen this structure in a grammer book or elsewhere, but it seems to work in muy mind! Althought im often wrong:) cheers all nath

    Moderator note: Multiple threads have been merged to create this one.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  2. sioban

    sioban Senior Member

    Orléans
    french - France
    "c'est moi qui l'ai fait" :tick:
    " c'est nous qui l'avons fait" :tick:
    Also does this also work with the verbs in the passé composé with être? Why don't you give an example?
     
  3. french4beth

    french4beth Senior Member

    Connecticut
    US-English
    You're right , nath.

    Found here http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/verbconjugation_2.htm:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  4. myrna Member

    Belgium
    Indonesia, Indonesian
    Hi all,

    I have a question. I just read a sentence : Ce n'est pas moi qui ai fait ça. In my opinion it should be : Ce n'est pas moi qui a fait ça, because qui refers to who. I need the explanation whether I am right or wrong.

    Thanks a lot and have a nice day all!
     
  5. carolineR

    carolineR Senior Member

    Indian Ocean
    France
    Ce n'est pas moi qui ai fait ça. :tick:
    Ce n'est pas moi qui a fait ça :cross: because qui refers to who. I need the explanation whether I am right or wrong.

    qui refers to moi, hence ai :)
    sorry, you were wrong :D
    c'est toi qui as fait ça
    c'est lui/elle qui a fait ça
    c'est nous qui avons fait ça
    c'est vous qui avez fait ça
    c'est eux/elles qui ont fait ça :)
     
  6. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Ce n'est pas moi qui ai fait ça is the correct solution.
    Since it's moi, it's got to be the first person singular. Qui has no influence on agreement.
     
  7. calembourde

    calembourde Senior Member

    Genève, Suisse
    New Zealand, English
    Hello,

    Naturally I would use the third person for phrases such as:

    C'est moi qui est heureuse
    It's me who is happy

    Because it means,

    La personne qui est heureuse, c'est moi

    But I have often hear people using the second person, as in phrases like:

    C'est moi qui suis heureuse

    Which would be 'It's me who am happy':cross: in English. So when a friend said, 'c'est toi qui est...' I asked whether it should/could be es and he said no, with the reason stated above. However, he admitted that sometimes people do that with 'c'est moi qui...'. Is there a rule to this? Is it correct, correct but informal, or incorrect?

    I thought it might be informal, but then I heard:

    C'est vous qui allez (faire quelque chose)

    from a radio host. It was a fairly formal discussion so I don't think he would have used something very informal.

    Also, that example shows that this happens for vous and not just for moi. So do people ever do this with toi?
     
  8. Sel&poivre

    Sel&poivre Senior Member

    Clermont-Ferrand/Vichy
    France - French
    I confirm the correct form in French is :
    - c'est moi qui suis
    - c'est toi qui es
    - c'est vous qui êtes
    - c'est nous qui sommes

    Qui refer to the subject (moi=je, toi=tu, etc).

    Hope it helps !
     
  9. calembourde

    calembourde Senior Member

    Genève, Suisse
    New Zealand, English
    Thanks Sel&poivre!

    I am surprised by your answer since both versions seem common, and it was a native French speaker who said it should be 'c'est toi qui est.' Do native speakers often get this wrong? Does it work this way for all verbs?
     
  10. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Calembourde, this is a common mistake French natives make, the only correct form is
    c'est moi qui suis though, as Sel&Poivre pointed out.

    It works for all verbs.

    C'est toi qui ranges , c'est elle qui dérange...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  11. Sel&poivre

    Sel&poivre Senior Member

    Clermont-Ferrand/Vichy
    France - French
    C'est vrai. Dans le langage parlé, je suis sûre que la plupart des Français feront la faute (d'où la réponse de votre ami). Mais malheureusement c'est très fréquent.
    Et effectivement il en va de même pour tous les verbes. Avec l'expression "c'est moi/toi/nous/vous", on doit toujours faire correspondre le verbe avec le sujet :
    - c'est moi qui dois (et non doit)
    - c'est vous qui devez (et non... rah ! je ne peux même pas l'écrire !!!)
    etc.

    Voilà ! :)
     
  12. calembourde

    calembourde Senior Member

    Genève, Suisse
    New Zealand, English
    I've just found this page which confirms it. (voir Leçon 51)

    Thanks for the responses, I'm really glad I asked this... now I will have better grammar than the natives. :D
     
  13. Fairyrose Senior Member

    France
    Laquelle des deux phrases est correcte, et pourquoi?

    C'est moi qui suis grand.
    C'est moi qui est grand.

    Merci de votre aide:)
     
  14. joleen

    joleen Senior Member

    England
    french / france
    C'est moi qui suis grand est la phrase correcte
     
  15. benjewels Senior Member

    Paris
    français, France
    c'est moi qui = Je >> je suis grand, c'est moi qui suis grand
    c'est lui qui = Il >> il est grand, c'est lui qui est grand
     
  16. pieanne

    pieanne Senior Member

    Nice Hinterland
    Belgium/French
    C'est moi qui suis
    C'est toi qui es
    C'est elle qui est
    C'est nous qui sommes
    C'est vous qui êtes
    C'est eux qui sont

    Bref, ça s'accorde avec la personne...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  17. nouvellerin Senior Member

    Bordeaux
    English (US)
    Moi qui me croyait un saint

    This is the title of a song by Thomas Fersen. Am I right to remark that the title has a grammatical error in it?

    Moi qui me croyais un saint.

    If this is not an error, can someone explain why?
    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  18. melu85 Senior Member

    Paris
    France/French
    good spot! definitely a grammar mistake.
     
  19. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod (AL, Sp-En mod)

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    When I read the title, I was about to tell you that there was a mistake indeed :D

    In French, the verb of the subordinate clause (?) agrees with the subject of the "main" clause:
    "C'est moi qui suis arrivé le premier."
    "C'est toi qui es arrivé le premier."
    "Cest nous qui sommes arrivés les premiers."

    ...

    (if you google it, you'll see that some sites write "Moi qui me croyais un saint" :)
     
  20. Bonjour, à la question suivante:

    -Est-ce toi qui as été chargé de cette mission délicate?

    Je répondais:

    Oui, c'est moi qui en a été chargé

    mais apparement c'est:

    Oui, c'est moi qui en ai été chargé

    Je comprends que je parle de moi, mais le sujet est "qui", pas "je".
    Quelle est la raison pour utiliser "ai", pas "a"?

    Merci en avance.
     
  21. madolo Senior Member

    "qui" a pour antécédent ( /est mis pour) "je " et en prend les caractéristiques : personne grammaticale, genre, nombre :
    c'est lui qui a été chargé
    ce sont elles qui ont été chargées
    c'est moi qui ai été chargé (chargée si "moi" est féminin)
     
  22. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    This is such an easy topic for English speakers to get confused about! :p

    The difficulty is that we most naturally say, I'm the one who has...
    But in French, they say, It is I who have....

    En English (I'm the one who has), we replace the original 1st-person subject (I) with 3rd person (the one who), and then we conjugate the verb in the subordinate accordingly, in the 3rd person (has).

    In the French structure (It is I who have), the original subject is 3rd person (it). We replace it with 1st person (I) and must therefore conjugate the verb in the subordinate in 1st person (have).

    Will that help you remember? :)
     
  23. leebenseng Senior Member

    Taiwan, Chinese
    Bonjour,

    Entre ces deux phrases: "C'est nous qui va être responsable" et "C'est nous qui vont être responsables", laquelle est correcte?

    Merci pour vos aides,

    Leebenseng
     
  24. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Aucune des deux… ;)

    C'est nous qui allons être responsables…
    Cf. Nous allons être responsables…
     
  25. leebenseng Senior Member

    Taiwan, Chinese
    Merci Maître Capello,
    "C'est moi qui vais être responsable", donc?
     
  26. roymail Senior Member

    Ardenne Belgium
    french (belgian)
    C'est bien ça.
     
  27. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    Ce sujet me confond...

    a. C'est moi qui le fait. (Il faut s'accorder le verbe - faire - avec le sujet - ce.)

    b. C'est nous qui allons être responsables. (Le verbe et le sujet ne s'accordent pas. Plutôt le verbe s'accorde avec le pronom disjonctif?)

    Pourquoi ?
     
  28. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Non, la phrase a est fausse. Il faut écrire :

    C'est moi qui le fais. (L'antécédent de qui est bien moi et non ce.)
     
  29. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    Alors, il faut s'accorder le verbe avec le pronom disjonctif puisqu'il est l'antécédent de "qui" dans tous les cas relatifs (avec "qui") ?
     
  30. MLJJ New Member

    (16) FRANCE
    Français
    C'est bien ça, oui.

    C'est moi qui le fais (moi = je, donc --> faiS) et C'est moi qui vaiS être responsable
    C'est toi qui le fais (toi = tu, donc --> faiS) et C'est toi qui vas être responsable
    C'est lui (ou elle) qui le faiT (lui = il, donc -->faiT) et C'est lui (ou elle) qui va être responsable
    C'est nous qui le faisons et C'est nous qui allons être responsables
    C'est vous qui le faites et C'est vous qui allez être responsables (ou responsable en cas de vouvoiement d'une personne)
    C'est eux qui le font (eux = ils donc --> font) et c'est eux (ou ce sont eux) qui vont être responsables
    C'est elles qui le font et ce sont elles qui vont être responsables
     
  31. yenrab New Member

    UK english
    Au début de La Nausée Sartre écrit la phrase suivante: 'Je crois que c'est moi qui ai changé.' J'imagine que c'est bien écrit, mais, en tant qu'anglais, je préfere: 'Je crois que c'est moi qui a changé'. Il me semble que en anglais le sujet de la deuxième clause n'est plus le même que ce de la première. En anglais je la traduirais par: 'I think that it is me who has changed' et certainement pas par: 'I think that is is me who have changed'. Il y a peut-être là une regle de grammaire que j'ignore.

    Corrigez mon français si vous y trouvez des erreurs. Merci d'avance.
     
  32. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Je crois que c'est moi qui ai changé. :tick:
    Je crois que c'est moi qui a changé. :cross:


    En français, le verbe s'accorde toujours avec son sujet. Ici, le sujet de la relative est qui, lequel reprend moi. Le verbe se conjugue donc à la première personne.

    Voir également (c'est) moi qui + accord du verbe sur le forum Français Seulement.
     
  33. atcheque

    atcheque mod errant (Fr-En, FS, Cz)

    Česko - Morava
    français (France)
    Bonjour,

    En français, quand on dit C'est moi, le sujet réel est bien moi (donc je) et non Ce.
    'Je crois que c'est moi qui ai changé.' = 'Je crois que moi, j'ai changé.' = 'I think I have changed':)
     
  34. drewfstr314

    drewfstr314 Member

    Ohio, United States
    English - USA
    Je ne comprends pas pourquoi ce n'est pas le sujet. Il y a deux propositions dans cette phrase. Donc, elle a besoin d'avoir deux sujets et deux verbes - chaque partie en a un. Le sujet est le mot qui "fait" le verbe, et l'objet et le mot à qui le sujet fait le verbe. Alors, en c'est moi, le verbe est est/être qui est transitif. Pour être, le sujet, l'un qui est, est ce. Qu'est-ce c'est? Moi. Alors, il me semble que le sujet est ce.

    Pourquoi est-ce c'est pas ça?
     
  35. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    In the sentence C'est moi qui ai changé, the pronoun ce is the subject of the verb être, and so we use the 3rd person singular conjugation est. So you're right: ce is a subject here (but I'm afraid you're wrong about être's transitive status: être is exclusively intransitive).

    As for the second half of the sentence, the true subject of the verb changer is the relative pronoun qui, which refers to moi. The relative pronoun takes on the number and gender of the thing it represents, and since it represents the speaker that makes it a first person singular subject, so we conjugate changer accordingly.

    This is only confusing because the parallel structure in English isn't something we use often these days. If English mirrored French, we would say things like "It is I who have [not "has"!] changed" or "It is we who represent [not "represents"!] your true family." But instead we switch to a 3rd person structure: "I am the one who has changed." And if you wanted to mirror that 3rd person structure back into French, you could say Je suis la personne qui a changé, where qui refers to la personne and is therefore 3rd person singular.
     
  36. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    In French, we sometimes distinguish the apparent subject (the strict grammatical subject) and the real subject (the subject in terms of meaning). As a matter of fact, the phrase c'est is just what we call a "présentatif" and doesn't bring any real meaning to the sentence.

    C'est moi qui ai changé.J'ai changé.

    apparent subject = ce
    real subject = moi/je
     

Share This Page

Loading...