FR: dès que, quand, lorsque, etc. + temps pour un événement futur

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by PPP, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. PPP Senior Member

    English
    Am I correct in having the verb that follows "des que" in the future tense?

    Je le contacterai dès que ma recherche avancera.

    Thank you! Also-- I think it is le instead of lui but would appreciate confirmation.

    Moderator note: Multiple threads merged to create this one.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2013
  2. Johanne

    Johanne Senior Member

    It seems good to me.
     
  3. PhilFrEn

    PhilFrEn Senior Member

    Annecy, France
    français - France
    Hi,

    sounds good also but I would better say: "Je le contacterai dès que ma recherche aura avancé". It sounds even better :).
     
  4. PPP Senior Member

    English
    Je le contacterai dès que ma recherche aura avancé

    is this the future anterieur tense? and can you explain why it's better than future-- is it because it comes before the action of contacting her?
     
  5. PhilFrEn

    PhilFrEn Senior Member

    Annecy, France
    français - France
    Indeed it is the "futur antérieur".

    I have found this: Quand 2 actions se passent dans le futur l'une après l'autre, on utilise le futur antérieur pour la première action, et le futur simple pour la deuxième action.

    Which means that when 2 actions occur in the future, you have to use the futur antérieur for the first action ;). Here, the first is that the project has to go further so that you can contact the person.
     
  6. sensa Senior Member

    Canada
    English, Canada
    Je ne comprends pas la difference entre "futur" et "futur antérieur" dans cette case:

    FUTUR
    -use it after temporal conjunctions "quand, lorsque, aussitôt que, dès que, pendant que, tandis que et aussi tant que" to exmplain a future fact.

    Quand vous voudrez me parler, je vous écouterai.

    FUTUR ANTÉRIEUR
    -use it to exmpliin a future action that is realized before another future action. To present this sequence, one generally uses a temporal conjunction "qui montre l'antériorité"(I don't know what that part means).

    Quand tu auras fini ton travail, tu pourras jouer.

    When do you use futur simple and when do you use futur antérieur?

    merci
     
  7. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    It means that the subordinate verb will have ended before the main verb will occur.

    The futur antérieur is not possible after "pendant que" for that reason.
    The futur antérieur is commonly found after une fois que, après que, dès que, aussitôt que.

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 26, 2014
  8. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Le futur antérieur est un temps « parfait », dans la terminologie de la grammaire anglaise. Les temps parfaits en général indiquent une action ou condition qui s'est finie avant une autre action.
     
  9. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
  10. mysterio626 Junior Member

    United States
    English, Japanese
    I recently had a conversation with my French teacher and said:

    "Quand je serai rentré chez moi, je ferai une sieste."

    She told me to use the futur simple in the "quand" clause. She said that since my coming home obviously came before my taking a nap, I should use the reg. future tense-not the future anterior.
    I thought the futur simple was used if both actions being talked about happens concurrently: like "Quand je finirai mes devoirs, je serai heureux." Any help will be appreciated! :)
     
  11. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    I agree with your teacher.

    Obviously, the two actions don't take place exactly at the same moment, but they are near enough to allow the employ of the future.

    It would be different, if there were a gap of time between the two, or if you intended to underline they are not simultaneous.

    "Quand je serai rentré, après avoir lu mon courrier, je ferai une sieste."

    In such sentences, consider first your intention, your point of view on the events you talk about. Both tenses are correct, but the future is lighter, and often you don't need to insist on the fact that one action comes before the other.
     
  12. Harmione Senior Member

    Switzerland French
    Oui, les 2 temps sont possibles, le futur antérieur marque simplement l'idée que l'action du 1er verbe est accomplie au moment de l'action exprimée par le 2ème verbe
     
  13. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    As explained by Itka and Harmione, both tenses are possible. However, contrary to what your teacher and Itka say, I'd personnally use the futur antérieur.
     
  14. fluffkin

    fluffkin Senior Member

    Grimsby
    England, English
    Hi there,
    I've written the sentence:

    'Lorsque l'eco-consommateur atteint la caisse, il ne prend pas un sac en plastique'

    It might be useful to note that I am talking about an imaginary scenario here, to show what the ideal consumer would do.

    I'm now wondering whether I should have used the future tense as I am talking about something that happens in the future >.<

    Any help would be really appreciated!

    x :)
     
  15. Tabac Senior Member

    Pacific Northwest (USA)
    U. S. - English
    With a time expression (lorsque, quand, aussitôt que) the French use the future tense when talking about a future action (unlike English).
     
  16. fluffkin

    fluffkin Senior Member

    Grimsby
    England, English
    Okay,
    so should I put the 'il ne prend pas un sac en plastique' part in the future tense as well:

    'Lorsque l'eco-consommateur atteindra la caisse, il ne prendra pas un sac en plastique'

    Thanks :)
     
  17. Tabac Senior Member

    Pacific Northwest (USA)
    U. S. - English
    Yes, absolutely.
     
  18. v1cky New Member

    English-US
    So I have been confused about when to use the futur anterieur and futur perfect forms.

    This is an example we had in class:

    Lorsque Jean-Loup ________ là, nous pourrons commencer la partie. (using être)

    I thought it would be
    "Lorsque Jean-Loup sera là, nous pourrons commencer la partie."

    but my teacher said it was actually
    "Lorsque Jean-Loup aura été là, nous pourrons commencer la partie."

    so if anyone can clear this up for me, I would appreciate it :)
     
  19. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    Are you sure of your examples? In this case I agree with you: "Lorsque Jean-Loup sera là, nous pourrons commencer la partie." is a correct sentence.

    The second sentence has a different meaning:

    "Lorsque Jean-Loup aura été là, nous pourrons commencer la partie." is a correct sentence, but it suggests Jean-Loup will have been here (and will probably have left) before you may start a game.

    (Of course if your teacher specifically asked you to use the futur antérieur, only the second sentence fits that requirement).
     
  20. v1cky New Member

    English-US
    thank you for replying! it was from an old AP test and the directions were to use the correct verb tense with the infinitive verb provided.
    And yeah I just rechecked the sentence and it is correct. It's from the 1984 test so maybe times have changed? lol I have no idea..

    Does anyone know when to use futur perfect or futur anterieur though? or give some examples? :)
     
  21. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    Well, it is generally used to express that a future action will be over, as in:

    Quand Jean-Loup aura fini de manger, nous pourrons commencer la partie.
    Que feras-tu, quand tu auras obtenu ton diplome?

    (I think it is almost the same in English, except that you would say "when you have done" instead of "when you will have done").
     
  22. v1cky New Member

    English-US
    isn't Jean-Loup's arrival a future action that is going to be over when the partie begins though?

    so when do you use just futur parfait with lorsque?
    I'm sorry, as you can see, I am very confused haha.
     
  23. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    (Using lorsque or quand works the same here regarding tenses and meaning).

    Note none of your sentences explicitly mentionned an arrival (they didn't use the verb "arriver"). They only deal with the idea of "being here".

    These two sentences express the same idea, and yet tenses differ:

    Lorsque Jean-Loup sera là, nous pourrons commencer la partie.
    Lorsque Jean-Loup sera arrivé, nous pourrons commencer la partie.

    (Arriver is a movement: when the movement is over, Jean-Loup is here, he has reached his destination. The movement is over, but the state of being here is still true. Note that unlike "finir", "arriver" needs the auxiliary être, which is why the word "sera" is present in both sentences).

    Likewise I think in these three sentences the first two are very close in meaning (in spite of tenses being different) while the third one is different (and I suspect it sounds silly, like "aura été là" in your example):

    When Jean-Loup is here, we may start playing.
    When Jean-Loup has joined us, we may start playing.
    When Jean-Loup has been here, we may start playing.
     
  24. mafia_fils New Member

    Thai
    Bonjour,

    Je voudrais savoir quelle est la différence entre

    Quand futur simple, futur simple

    et

    Quand futur antérieur, futur simple ?

    Par exemple,
    - Quand il viendra, je sortirai avec lui.
    - Quand tu auras fini ton plat, je te donnerai des bonbons.

    Dans la phrase ci-dessous, entre le futur simple et le futur antérieur, lequel devrais-je utiliser pour compléter la case?

    "Vous irez mieux quand vous (être) ........... opéré."

    Merci :)
     
  25. quinoa Senior Member

    french
    On utilisera le futur antérieur s'il est absolument nécesssaire de marquer l'antétiorité d'une action par rapport à l'autre.
    Il est indispensable que l'action "finir", que par ailleurs on suppose ici déjà commencée, soit arrivée à son terme pour réaliser la deuxième. Cette antériorité est posée comme absolument nécessaire, ce qui la transforme presque en une condition.

    Ici les deux actions, toutes deux au futur simple sont sur le même plan quant à leur forme. Il y a pourtant un ordre dans le temps, "venir" se produira avant "sortir". Mais ici "venir" se retrouve comme point de repère, point de départ.

    On imagine mal ici "quand il sera venu", en revanche "Quand il sera arrivé" marche très bien. Et si on l'oppose à "Quand il arrivera", l'antériorité marque plus de "temps" entre les deux actions comme si on attendra un peu avant de repartir. Alors qu'avec les deux futurs simples, il se produit une impression d'immédiateté. Tout est question de point de vue. Avec les deux temps simples on a un regard sans cesse orienté vers le futur, vers l'après, vers la trame des événements qui avancent. Le mouvement des actions et le regard porté sur elles vont dans le même sens.
    Avec l'intervention du futur antérieur, les événements vont toujours vers l'avenir, mais le regard marque un retour en arrière parce que pour que se rélise la deuxième action, il a fallu en poser une autre avant.
    J'ai l'impression de ne pas être très clair...
     
  26. latourte Junior Member

    Québec, Canada
    French - Canada
    Vous irez mieux quand vous serez opéré.
     
  27. Barsac Senior Member

    region of Bordeaux
    french - français
    Vous irez mieux quand vous aurez été opéré.
    Quand l'opération sera terminée (favorablement), vous irez mieux.
     
  28. vivian10 New Member

    English - U.S.
    J'ai une question à propos de cette discussion qui me gêne depuis quelques jours. Mes élèves m'ont posé cette question à propos du futur antérieur et je ne savais pas comment répondre.

    Pour les phrases "Quand/Aussitôt que/Dès que/etc.", c'est clair qu'on utilise le futur si l'action exprimée se produit au futur: par example, "Lorsque je serai à Paris, je verrai ma tante". Et je comprends que le futur antérieur s'emploie quand une action dans le futur sera réalisée et terminée avant une deuxième action au futur: "Lorsque nous aurons vu le film, nous le discuterons en classe". Mais mes élèves m'ont posé la question suivante: dans le premier exemple, n'est-il pas nécessaire d'arriver à Paris avant de voir la tante, et si oui, pourquoi pas utiliser le futur antérieur ("Lorsque je serai arrivée à Paris, je verrai ma tante")? Après avoir lu cette discussion, je crois qu'on peut dire les deux et c'est simplement une question de contexte et de point de vue. Mais quand il s'agit des activités dans leurs cahiers où il faut choisir entre le futur simple et le futur antérieur, c'est difficile à discerner. Ils choisissent toujours le futur antérieur, en pensant qu'une action doit toujours se réaliser avant une autre...

    Merci d'avance.
     
  29. Rm951 Junior Member

    French
    On peux en effet dire les deux, vivian10. En fait, ça dépend tout simplement du verbe que tu utilises. :)

    Avec le verbe "être", c'est au futur simple que se passe l'action, lorsque je serai.
    Si tu mets au futur antérieur, tu parles du moment futur au moment où tu es à Paris, quand l'action d'être à Paris s'est déroulé.

    Mais avec le verbe "arriver", il faut que l'action d'arriver se soit passée, donc lorsque je serai arrivé. Tu parles ici du moment où l'action d'arriver s'est passé, donc quand tu y es. :)
     
  30. vivian10 New Member

    English - U.S.
    Merci, Rm951. L'explication que vous avez fournie est très claire. Alors, pour aller un peu plus loin, diriez-vous que les verbes être, avoir, pouvoir, savoir - et tous les verbes qui expliquent la manière d'être - se conjuguent normalement au futur et non pas le futur antérieur dans les phrases Quand/Lorsque/etc.?

    Par exemple:

    "Quand j'aurai mon permis de conduire, je pourrai conduire". [futur simple]

    Serait-il possible de dire: "Quand j'aurai eu mon permis de conduire, je pourrai conduire"? Je pense que non. Par contre, on pourrait dire: "Quand j'aurai obtenu mon permis de conduire, je pourrai conduire", parce que le verbe a changé...

    Merci mille fois :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  31. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Les choses ne sont pas aussi simples que ça puisque tant le futur que le futur antérieur sont possibles dans ce cas. En effet, on n'a le droit de conduire qu'après avoir eu son permis et cette antériorité peut se marquer à l'aide du futur antérieur.

    Quand j'aurai mon permis de conduire, je pourrai conduire. :tick:

    Quand j'aurai eu mon permis de conduire, je pourrai conduire. :tick:

    Par contre, pour l'exemple de Paris, tu dois forcément être encore à Paris pour aller voir ta tante (pour autant que ta tante habite bien Paris) et donc le futur antérieur n'est pas possible avec le verbe être alors que les deux temps sont possibles avec arriver, encore qu'avec un sens différent.

    Lorsque je serai à Paris, j'irai voir ma tante. → Tu iras voir ta tante pendant ton séjour à Paris.

    Lorsque j'aurai été à Paris, j'irai voir ma tante. → Après ton séjour à Paris, tu iras voir ta tante (qui n'habite donc pas Paris).

    Lorsque j'arriverai à Paris, j'irai voir ma tante. → Tu iras voir ta tante dès ton arrivée à Paris.

    Lorsque je serai arrivé à Paris, j'irai voir ma tante. → Tu iras voir ta tante après être arrivé à Paris, mais pas forcément immédiatement.

    En résumé, le futur marque la simultanéité par rapport au verbe principal, tandis que le futur antérieur marque l'antériorité.
     
  32. Kaioxygen

    Kaioxygen Senior Member

    England
    England, English
    Rappelle-moi dès que tu as terminé.
    Rappelle-moi dès que tu auras terminé.
    I understand that the future perfect is used after dès que etc, but I hear people saying the first exemple. Is it because it's an imperative? I don't understand.
    Thanks for all your help.
     
  33. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Both tenses are indeed correct in this case.

    Rappelle-moi dès que tu as terminé. :tick:
    Rappelle-moi dès que tu auras terminé.
    :tick:

    In fact, when referring to close future events—the closeness being subjective—, you can also use the present in everyday spoken French, e.g., Je pars demain.

    Likewise, when talking about something taking place before some future event, you can use the passé composé as in you example (Rappelle-moi dès que tu as terminé).
     
  34. Gérard Napalinex

    Gérard Napalinex Senior Member

    Vaulx-en-Velin, France
    French - France
    To add up on Me Cappello, here the difference I get:
    Rappelle-moi dès que tu as terminé ==> You're currently doing it
    Rappelle-moi dès que tu auras terminé ==> You've not started doing it yet

    Only feeling, no grammar here :)
     
  35. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    I beg to disagree. In either case, you can have started it or not.

    Ah, tu es en train de manger… Rappelle-moi dès que tu as/auras terminé.
    Ah, tu vas manger dans cinq minutes… Rappelle-moi dès que tu as/auras terminé.
     
  36. Gérard Napalinex

    Gérard Napalinex Senior Member

    Vaulx-en-Velin, France
    French - France
    Sounds really weird to me - but we're living in different countries, so maybe that's an explanation.

    Et de toute façon, il faut bien que le futur antérieur serve à quelque chose, non ;) ?
     
  37. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    Not weird at all to me... That's the way it works everywhere in France or in Switzerland as well.
    Gerard Napalinex, je pense que ça se dit naturellement partout en France (et en particulier à Lyon où j'ai habité et où l'on parle... comme chez moi !) Mais rien ne t'empêche d'employer le futur antérieur, si ça te plaît mieux.
     
  38. Gérard Napalinex

    Gérard Napalinex Senior Member

    Vaulx-en-Velin, France
    French - France
    Ce qui me plairait surtout, c'est de comprendre dans quel cas le futur antérieur est indiqué :)
    Et, pour tout te dire, j'ai grandi en Touraine... une autre piste ? ;)
     
  39. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Dans cet exemple, la différence principale est que le passé composé est un peu plus vivant et relève de la langue de tous les jours tandis que le futur antérieur sera un peu plus soutenu. Mais il s'agit vraiment d'une nuance…
     
  40. L'Embrouilleur Senior Member

    English - American
    Je voudrais savoir le règle régissant l'usage de "dès que" + le temps futur, svp.
    Par exemple, "dès que 'x' arrive (ou arrivera?) je ferai 'y'."
    En anglais, on utilise le présent puis le futur. Mon intuition me dit qu'en français on utilise le futur puis le futur...mais je n'en suis pas sûr.
    Merci d'avance.
     
  41. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    En français, on utilisera soit uniquement le présent, soit uniquement le futur, dans une telle phrase.
    -> Dès que X arrive, je fais Y.
    -> Dès que X arrivera, je ferai Y.

    Je ne vois aucune réelle différence de sens entre ces deux tournures, si ce n'est, peut-être, que celle au présent exprime une plus grande proximité de l'évènement attendu, dans l'esprit du locuteur.
     
  42. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  43. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    N'y a-t-il pas une (très légère) nuance de sens ici, dans la mesure où le moment ou X arrivera précède nécessairement celui où X sera arrivé ?
     
  44. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    Your intuition is on the right track. :thumbsup:

    Unlike English, French does not allow mixed (présent+futur, P+F) tenses in sentences that use quand, lorsque, aussitôt que, or dès que (+ other synonyms) to talk about things that have not yet come to pass. Instead, you'll used P+P (often giving the idea of "whenever"), or F+F (for a specific future event)... or a combination of F + futur antérieur (also for a specific future event).

    The key point being that English (illogically) lets us use the present tense to talk about future events/conditions ("When I retire..."), but French logically uses the future to talk about them (literally saying "When I will retire...")
     
  45. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Sans doute… Le futur antérieur marque la succession, la séquence des événements, tandis que le futur marque davantage l'immédiateté, la rapidité de cette succession. Mais c'est surtout une question de style, je dirais.
     
  46. PepperPony New Member

    English
    :s this is probably very late and not very useful but I thought lorsque couldn't be used with the future tense - could any natives verify this?
     
  47. Oddmania

    Oddmania Senior Member

    France
    French
    I don't think so, there's nothing wrong with using the future tense with lorsque :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2011
  48. blasius87 New Member

    English - United States
    Bonjour,

    Je voudrais savoir s'il y avait une différence de sens entre:

    Je t'appelle quand je rentre, et
    Je t'appellerai quand je rentrai.

    Les deux phrases sont-elles correctes ?
    Si oui, y a-t-il une différence de sens entre les deux phrases ?

    Si les temps des deux verbes sont les mêmes, pourrait-on utiliser et le présent et le futur ?

    N'hésitez pas à corriger mes erreurs.

    Merci beaucoup !
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011
  49. TA4U Senior Member

    près de Montréal
    Français, Québec
    Il n'y a pas de différence de sens entre les deux énoncés.
    Dans le premier, l'interlocuteur utilise le présent en se plaçant lui-même dans le futur.
    Dans le second, il faudrait écrire: ''quand je rentrerai''
     
  50. Jean-Michel Carrère Senior Member

    French from France
    Both sentences are correct.
     

Share This Page